Archive for the ‘Resistance’ Category

WHY I’M VOTING FOR TRUMP

Wednesday, April 10th, 2024

 

Letters: What I tell my friends when they ask me why I’m voting for Trump (10/31/20)

Friends, why I support Trump

When friends ask me why I am voting for President Donald Trump, I tell them I’m not voting for a personality, but for policies I believe are best for our country.

• I’m voting for tax policies that keep businesses competitive globally and sustain employment growth and economic opportunity.

• I’m voting for judges who do not legislate from the bench.

• I’m voting for properly funded and trained police departments that protect all citizens regardless of color.

• I’m voting for an accountable and functional Veterans Administration.

• I’m voting for fair trade policies.

• I’m voting for logical immigration laws consistent with international best practices.

• I’m voting for peace through strength.

• I’m voting for all NATO nations to pay their share of the burden.

• I’m voting for peace in the Middle East and the protection of Israel

• I’m voting for the continued growth of natural gas through fracking and its positive impact on CO2 emissions.

• I’m voting for sensible abortion laws that protect life in late-term situations.

• I’m voting for the Electoral College, so California and New York do not control the election.

• I’m voting for a market-based health plan that promotes competition, protects pre-existing conditions and reduces cost.

I’m sorry my friends can’t get past hating a president with a disturbing personality but also with sound policies.

Henry Rissier, Silverthorne

Share

GENERAL FLYNN SPEAKS OUT

Monday, April 8th, 2024
PLEASE CLICK ON THE LINK TO VIEW THE 2 VIDEOS  AND TO READ THE ENTIRE ARTICLE

GENERAL FLYNN JUST HANDED THE 2024 ELECTION VICTORY TO TRUMP

 

Share

Georgia Election Board Member Testifies Signatures Weren’t Verified on 147,000 ballots in 2020 Election

Tuesday, April 2nd, 2024

April 2, 2024/by World Tribune

Mark Wingate, who served on the Fulton County Board of Registration and Elections, testified on Monday that there was no signature verification done on Fulton County absentee ballots in the 2020 election.

Wingate is testifying in the D.C. disbarment trial of Trump Administration Department of Justice official Jeffrey Clark.

The Fulton County 2020 election should never have been certified because there was no signature verification done at all on absentee ballots, he said.

Joe Biden reportedly won Georgia by about 12,000 votes.

Wingate said he voted not to certify the 2020 election twice, adding that what concerned him was there were more voters on the active rolls than eligible, which continued after the 2020 election, and nothing was done to answer his questions about it. He requested chain of custody documentation and it was never turned over to him.

PLEASE CLICK HERE TO VIEW THE VIDEO AND READ THE ENTIRE ARTICLE

Share

VIDEO -TUCKER CARLSON INTERVIEWS JOURNALIST ARRESTED FOR JAN 6

Friday, March 22nd, 2024
VIDEO – TUCKER CARLSON SPEAKS WITH A JOURNALIST ARRESTED FOR JANUARY 6 

Uncensored: Arrested for Exposing the J6 Myth

Uncensored•Published Mar 20, 2024•15 mins

EPISODE DETAILS

Joe Biden has put hundreds of his political opponents in jail. Here’s the latest, a working journalist who’s exposed the fraudulence of the January 6th myth.

Share

RACIAL DISPARITY/RACIAL DISCRIMINATION

Wednesday, March 13th, 2024

 

This  madness of racial disparity is the result of racial discrimination will only lead to  a further rapid decline of our country.    Nancy  

FEBRUARY 2024 | VOLUME 53, ISSUE 2

Disparate Impact Thinking Is Destroying Our Civilization

Heather Mac Donald

Manhattan Institute

Heather Mac Donald is the Thomas W. Smith Fellow at the Manhattan Institute and a contributing editor of City Journal. She earned a B.A. from Yale University, an M.A. in English from Cambridge University, and a J.D. from Stanford Law School. She writes for several newspapers and periodicals, including The Wall Street Journal, the Los Angeles Times, and The New Criterion, and is the author of several books, including The War on Cops: How the New Attack on Law and Order Makes Everyone Less Safe and When Race Trumps Merit: How the Pursuit of Equity Sacrifices Excellence, Destroys Beauty, and Threatens Lives.

The following is adapted from a talk delivered on February 15, 2024, at a Hillsdale College National Leadership Seminar in Naples, Florida.

The most consequential falsehood in American public policy today is the idea that any racial disparity in any institution is by definition the result of racial discrimination.

If a cancer research lab, for example, does not have 13 percent black oncologists—the black share of the national population—it is by definition a racist lab that discriminates against competitively qualified black oncologists; if an airline company doesn’t have 13 percent black pilots, it is by definition a racist airline company that discriminates against competitively qualified black pilots; and if a prison population contains more than 13 percent black prisoners, our law enforcement system is racist.

The claim that racial disparities are proof of racial discrimination has been percolating in academia and the media for a long time. After the George Floyd race riots of 2020, however, it was adopted by America’s most elite institutions, from big law and big business to big finance. Even museums and orchestras took up the cry.

Many thought that STEM—the fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics—would escape the diversity sledgehammer. They were wrong. The American Medical Association today insists that medicine is characterized by white supremacy. Nature magazine declares that science manifests one of “humankind’s worst excesses”: racism. The Smithsonian Institution announces that “emphasis on the scientific method” and an interest in “cause and effect relationships” are part of totalitarian whiteness.

As a result of this falsehood, we are eviscerating meritocratic and behavioral standards in accordance with what is known as “disparate impact analysis.”

 

Consider medicine. Step One of the medical licensing exam, taken during or after the second year of medical school, tests medical students’ knowledge of anatomy, physiology, and pathology. On average, black students score lower on the grading curve, making it harder for them to land their preferred residencies. Step One, in other words, has a “disparate impact” on black medical students. The solution, implemented last year, was to eliminate the Step One grading disparity by instituting a pass–fail system. Hospitals choosing residents can no longer distinguish between high and low achieving students—and that is precisely the point!

(more…)

Share

TRUMP RALLY, GREENSBORO, NC, MARCH 2, 2024

Thursday, March 7th, 2024

Jackie, Cindy and Nancy at the rally

Share

SECRET OBAMA MEMO COULD AFFECT JACK SMITH’S CASE AGAINST TRUMP

Tuesday, March 5th, 2024

SECRET OBAMA MEMO COULD IMPACT JACK SMITH’S CLASSIFIED DOCUMENTS CASE

AGAINST TRUMP

 

Share

MARK LEVIN AND MARIA BARTIROMO SUNDAY SHOWS- MARCH 3, 2024

Monday, March 4th, 2024

 

Sunday Morning Futures with Maria Bartiromo 3/3/24 FULL SHOW

LIFE, LIBERTY & LEVIN SUNDAY MARCH 3, 2024 (partial showclarkna@aol.comclar
Share

CPAC 2024- ‘DARK FORCES’ WARNING FROM PRESIDENT OF EL SALVADOR

Saturday, February 24th, 2024

 

CPAC 2024  – EL SALVADOR PRESIDENT NAYIB BUKELE  – WARNS OF THE ‘ DARK FORCES’ IN THE UNITED STATES IN ANTI CRIME SPEECH 
Feb 22, 2024

At CPAC, El Salvador President Nayib Bukele decried “globalism” and warned about social and civilizational decline.

cpac 2024
Share

HOW REPUBLICS END

Wednesday, February 21st, 2024

 

How Republics End

AMAC Exclusive – By Walter Samuel  Walter Samuel is the pseudonym of a prolific international affairs writer and academic. He has worked in Washington as well as in London and Asia, and holds a Doctorate in International History.

Tuesday, February 20, 2024

“Welcome as the death of Nero had been in the first burst of joy, yet it had not only roused various emotions in Rome, among the Senators, the people, or the soldiery of the capital, it had also excited all the legions and their generals; for now had been divulged that secret of the empire, that emperors could be made elsewhere than at Rome.”

Thus the Roman historian Tacitus reflected on the events of 69 AD, the Year of Four Emperors, where first the Praetorian Guard, then the armies on the Rhine, and finally the armies in Judea foisted emperors on the Roman Senate and people. It was a year when the unthinkable became thinkable.

As Tacitus notes, there had been no physical force that could have stopped a Roman army from marching on Rome and installing its own emperor other than the actions of a different Roman army. But prior to 69 AD, it never occurred to the soldiers that they could dictate orders to Rome rather than the other way around, and generals sent to the frontiers saw it as exile from the center of political power rather than an opportunity.

From 69 AD onwards, however, every Roman general would view marching on Rome as a possible contingency, and every emperor would have to consider that possibility whenever appointing, removing, or managing military appointments. Once the “secret of empire,” as Tacitus termed it, was out, there was no going back. A psychological Rubicon — not a legal or geographical one — had been crossed, and the  actual balance of power within the Roman state had shifted forever.

On February 16, Donald Trump was found guilty of fraudulently inflating earnings by Judge Arthur Engoron, barred from doing business in the state of New York for three years, and ordered to pay $354 million. Because of a quirk of New York state law, which allows for the penalty to begin accruing interest from the time charges are brought rather than from conviction, the actual sum may be closer to $450 million.

Notably, Donald Trump was not found guilty by a jury of his peers. There was no jury, and the judge sat on his own. The charges themselves were not brought by wronged parties as is typical in a civil suit, but by the Attorney General of New York State, Letitia James, who had campaigned on a platform of explicitly targeting Donald Trump.

For many Americans, the politicalized nature of the proceedings is self-evident. For others, the trial represented a long-overdue act of justice and a recognition that ‘no one is above the law’. Whether that justice relates to the technical charges behind the case or a more cosmic desire to punish Donald Trump for winning in 2016, and everything they blame him for that followed, varies from person to person. The irony is that if there is one point almost everyone agrees upon, it is that the entire process of prosecuting Donald Trump is an inherently political act.

(more…)

Share
Search All Posts
Categories