Archive for the ‘WW II’ Category

VIDEO VJ DAY CELEBRATION IN HONOLULU 1945

Sunday, August 16th, 2020
This weekend we are celebrating VJ Day which signaled the end of WW II.  I send this video  out every year as it  just represents a time in our country when we were all united in the celebration of the end of 4 long years of a world war.  .  A wonderful home movie from the celebrations of our military when the unofficial announcement of the Japanese surrender in Honolulu was made in 1945.  In the background, Jimmy Durante sings “I’ll be seeing you”.   Enjoy !   Nancy
VIDEO   VJ DAY IN HONOLULU  AUGUST 14, 1945  (Official surrender signing was
Sept 1, 1945)

 

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2 VIDEOS LET US REMEMBER

Monday, May 25th, 2020

 

The following was shared with us by Susan Metts, the Mid-Atlantic Region Advancement Officer of the National Rifle Association in honor of Memorial Day.  Susan is also one of our conservative ladies and a very special friend !   Nancy

 

“Let every nation know, whether it wishes us well or ill, that we shall pay any price, bear any burden, meet any hardship, support any friend, oppose any foe to assure the survival and the success of liberty.” -President John F. Kennedy, 1961-1963

You may already know that Memorial Day was originally called Decoration Day. Established after the Civil War, General John A. Logan, a Union Veteran’s Association leader, organized the first national Decoration Day in 1868. Coincidentally, two of his Union veteran peers established the National Rifle Association three years later.

The celebration of Decoration Day transformed into Memorial Day, and as we all assuredly know, it is still celebrated today.

Evoking strong emotions, many creative artists have commemorated Memorial Day to capture the spirit for all to remember. However, below are two special links that I found particularly moving. I hope you enjoy them too.

Just a Common Soldier, a poem by Lawrence Vaincourt

www.youtube.com/watch?v=eEs4ke7cdNQ

Amazing Grace to Bagpipes

www.youtube.com/watch?v=2O0daPfqSV0

Thank you to all who served and those who serve by loving a service member. The United States of America’s survival and success is truly in your debt – something we at the NRA keep at the forefront of our minds as we serve you.

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VIDEO MEMORIAL DAY TRIBUTE

Monday, May 25th, 2020

 

VIDEO  MEMORIAL DAY TRIBUTE 
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VICTOR DAVIS HANSON – MEMBERS OF PREVIOUS GENERATIONS NOW SEEM LIKE GIANTS

Sunday, May 3rd, 2020

 

Past vs. Present

Victor Davis Hanson column: Members of previous generations now seem like giants

Oct 9, 2019

 

www.richmond.com/opinion/columnists/victor-davis-hanson-column-members-of-previous-generations-now-seem-like-giants/article_bca413bb-5505-5ee9-8ed8-86a25e4f57a9.html

Many of the stories about the gods and heroes of Greek mythology were compiled during the Greek Dark Ages. Impoverished tribes passed down oral traditions that originated after the fall of the lost palatial civilizations of the Mycenaean Greeks.

Dark Age Greeks tried to make sense of the massive ruins of their forgotten forbearers’ monumental palaces that were still standing around. As illiterates, they were curious about occasional clay tablets they plowed up in their fields with incomprehensible ancient Linear B inscriptions.

We of the 21st century are beginning to look back at our own lost epic times and wonder about these now-nameless giants who left behind monuments that we cannot replicate, but instead merely use or even mock.

Does anyone believe that contemporary Americans could build another transcontinental railroad in six years?

Californians tried to build a high-speed rail line. But after more than a decade of government incompetence, lawsuits, cost overruns and constant bureaucratic squabbling, they have all but given up.

The result is a half-built overpass over the skyline of Fresno — and not yet a foot of track laid.

Who were those giants of the 1960s responsible for building our interstate highway system?

California’s roads now are mostly the same as we inherited them, although the state population has tripled. We have added little to our freeway network, either because we forgot how to build good roads or would prefer to spend the money on redistributive entitlements.

 

When California had to replace a quarter section of the earthquake-damaged San Francisco Bay Bridge, it turned into a near-disaster, with 11 years of acrimony, fighting, cost overruns — and a commentary on our decline into Dark Ages primitivism. Yet 82 years ago, our ancestors built four times the length of our single replacement span in less than four years.

It took them just two years to design the entire Bay Bridge and award the contracts.

Our generation required five years just to plan to replace a single section. In inflation-adjusted dollars, we spent six times the money on a quarter of the length of the bridge and required 13 agencies to grant approval. In 1936, just one agency oversaw the entire bridge project.

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GRATITUDE TOWARDS AMERICA – TREVOR LOUDON

Friday, December 6th, 2019

 

 A Personal Note:  Years ago, while my husband and I were living in Sydney, Australia, we were having dinner at a restaurant when the waiter came over to our table and gave us a bottle of champagne.  The waiter explained that the gentleman at another table had recognized that we were Americans and he wanted  to thank us  for The Battle of the Coral Sea.   A very special moment that I will never forget. This article was written by Trevor Loudon and he explains why he feels such gratitude to the United States .  It is because of our help to Australia and New Zealand during the Second World War.  Nancy

My Thanksgiving to America

Trevor Loudon
Trevor Loudon is an author, filmmaker, and public speaker from New Zealand. For more than 30 years, he has researched radical left, Marxist, and terrorist movements and their covert influence on mainstream politics.
CONTRIBUTOR
December 2, 2019

Over the Thanksgiving period, I pondered a lot on my debt to America. The first thing I owe this great country is probably my very existence. When growing up in 1960s New Zealand, it was accepted wisdom that we owed our freedom and our very lives to the “Yanks.”

In 1942, tens of thousands of young Kiwi and Aussie men were in North Africa fighting the Nazis and the Italian Fascist armies. The Japanese Imperial Army was marching relentlessly through the South Pacific and South East Asia. The Philippines fell; Hong Kong, Singapore, the Dutch East Indies, New Guinea, all were invaded in a matter of months, capturing thousands of British, Dutch, and colonial troops in the process.

The Japanese air force bombed Darwin in Northern Australia. There were reports of Japanese submarines in New Zealand harbors. In 1942, 22 New Zealand prisoners of war were beheaded by the Japanese on Tarawa. In 1943, Japanese prisoners rioted at a prisoner of war camp in our little North Island town of Featherston. More than 30 Japanese and one New Zealand guard were killed before order was restored. Rumors flew that the Japanese had already printed up the currency they were going to use when they invaded us.

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A SHORT VETERANS DAY FICTIONAL STORY

Sunday, November 10th, 2019

 

In honor of Veterans Day, I am sending out a fictional short story that was written by Edward Reed especially for Veterans Day.  To read more of Edward Reed’s writings, the link below will take you to his website.  Several of my favorite short stories of his is Old Dogs  and Valley of the Shadow.  Badge, one of his published books, is also a favorite.  Edward Reed writes of  a time of family love, hardship,  patriotism and the once common appreciation of the simple things of life.   Nancy

The Rest of the Story

The Rest of the Story

For over fifty years Luther Hobbs, Wilmer’s Hobbs’ younger brother, has flown a flag every Veterans Day. It was something his father did until he no longer could, then Luther took over. It was a way to honor Wilmer,  a way to remember.

Luther will be the first to admit that his memory isn’t as good as it used to be

“Time is catching up to me,” is something he says more and more these days while watching  the evening sun drift behind tall trees he used to climb as a boy. That was until Wilmer was killed. After Wilmer was killed climbing trees was no longer fun.

Wilmer had taught him how to climb trees,  and so many other things, things he would never forget things like;  how to throw a curve ball, how to bait a fishing hook, ride a bicycle, how to not be afraid of the dark, and the Lord’s Prayer.

Wilmer taught him how to tie his shoes too. Luther still remembers that afternoon, and how long it took and how patient Wilmer was as they sat on the porch steps until he finally caught on. He remembers it every morning when he ties his shoe laces.

Sometimes he hears Wilmer’s voice whispering to him and sometimes calling out from across the fields, and sometimes when he walks along the stream. It was by the stream where Wilmer first told him he was going away to fight in the war. It was where Wilmer let him listen to his grandfather’s watch that last time.

Luther thinks about that watch now and then. He still remembers its ticks and tocks. The old watch wasn’t among Wilmer’s things that the Army sent home after he was killed.

Luther still kept those things, a few medals, and ribbons, Wilmer’s dog tag, and two stripes that he never got around to sewing onto his uniform. He keeps them in a box, the same box that he keeps the flag that once draped his brother’s coffin. Its the flag he takes out every Veteran’s day and hoists high, unfurling it in the crisp November breeze just as the sun peaks over the mountain top.

This Veteran’s Day, like Luther’s memories, there is not as much left of his brother’s flag  to dance in the morning breeze.

Two weeks ago Luther’s grandchildren  dug the old flag out burned it. When he was awakened by smoke he thought his whole world was on fire. In a way it was and still is as he continues nursing burns from reaching in the hot blazing flames.

He did it without thinking.

“A silly thing,” the doctor at the emergency room told him.

Luther listened.

“It’s just an old flag,” the doctor said more than once. It was the same thing celebrities say, and what his grandchildren said while they watched him rescue the old flag they set out to destroy.

“Because being an American isn’t cool.”

By some miracle all of the red, white, and blue wasn’t burned and enough stars and stripes survived for Luther Hobbs to fly his brother’s flag this Veteran’s Day and remember.

I pray this is a work of fiction I pray, but fear it’s not. Edward Reed 2019

 

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VIDEO HITLER SURVIVOR – “KEEP YOUR GUNS”

Thursday, September 12th, 2019

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VIDEO – PRESIDENT TRUMP’S SPEECH – D-DAY 75TH ANNIVERSARY – NORMANDY, FRANCE

Thursday, June 13th, 2019

 

 

VIDEO

Trump’s speech at 75th D-Day anniversary in Normandy | Full remarks

You are the greatest among us that will ever live, you are the pride of our nation, you are the glory of our republic and we thank you from the bottom of our hearts, says President Trump thanking WWII veterans.
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VIDEO D-DAY PRAGER U

Tuesday, June 4th, 2019

 

VIDEO – D-DAY   PRAGER U

D-Day

May 27, 2019

2.6m

On June 6, 1944, Allied forces stormed the beaches of Normandy in northern France. Their goal: to liberate Western Europe from Nazi tyranny. From a distance, it might seem that victory was pre-ordained, but no one felt that way at the time. British military historian Peter Caddick-Adams tells the incredible story of what happened on that monumental day.

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VIDEO MARK LEVIN WITH DR. PAUL KENGOR –

Friday, February 1st, 2019

 

 

Ted Kennedy and Russia  1983  and Soviet Spies in President Franklin Roosevelt’s administration

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