Archive for the ‘Technology’ Category

NAVY, INDUSTRY PARTNERS ARE ‘UNDER CYBER SIEGE’ BY CHINESE HACKERS

Tuesday, March 12th, 2019

 

THE WALL STREET JOURNAL

Navy, Industry Partners Are ‘Under Cyber Siege’ by Chinese Hackers, Review Asserts

Hacking threatens U.S.’s standing as world’s leading military power, study says

Navy Secretary Richard V. Spencer testified before the Senate Committee on Armed Services last week.
Navy Secretary Richard V. Spencer testified before the Senate Committee on Armed Services last week. PHOTO: RON SACHS/ZUMA PRESS

March 12, 2019 2:32 p.m. ET

WASHINGTON—The Navy and its industry partners are “under cyber siege” by Chinese hackers and others who have stolen tranches of national security secrets in recent years, exploiting critical weaknesses that threaten the U.S.’s standing as the world’s top military power, an internal Navy review has concluded.

The assessment, delivered to Navy Secretary Richard Spencer last week and reviewed by The Wall Street Journal, depicts a branch of the armed forces under relentless cyberattack by foreign adversaries and struggling in its response to the scale and sophistication of the problem.

Drawing from extensive research and interviews with senior officials across the Trump administration, the tone of the review is urgent and at times dire, offering a rare, unfiltered look at the military’s cybersecurity liabilities.

KEY TAKEAWAYS FROM THE NAVY REVIEW

The Navy report’s authors conducted 31 site visits and interviewed 85 current senior military officers and civilians across both the Navy and wider Defense Department, as well as senior officials at the Federal Bureau of Investigation, Department of Homeland Security and White House National Security Council, among others. Here are their main conclusions:

  • The Navy and its industry partners are facing relentless cyber attacks that seek to steal sensitive national security data by a wide range of foes, with China and Russia the most adept and strategic.
  • The U.S. is at risk of losing global military and economic advantages due to cyberthefts of secrets and intellectual property.
  • Despite efforts to address the problem, the defense industrial base has suffered “a flood of breaches of significant data” and “continues to hemorrhage critical data.”
  • The Navy and Defense Department have only a limited understanding of the totality of losses they and their partners are suffering.
  • The Navy is focused on “preparing to win some future kinetic battle, while it is losing the current global, counter-force, counter-value, cyber war,” the review’s authors conclude.

The 57-page document is especially scathing in its assessment of how the Navy has addressed cybersecurity challenges facing its contractors and subcontractors, faulting naval officials for not anticipating that adversaries would attack the defense industrial base and for not adequately informing those partners of the cyber threat. It also acknowledges a lack of full understanding about the extent of the damage.

(more…)

Share

THE GREEN NEW DEAL’S IMPOSSIBLE ELECTRIC GRID

Monday, February 25th, 2019

 

THE WALL STREET JOURNAL

The Green New Deal’s Impossible Electric Grid

Renewable energy can’t consistently balance power supply with demand.

Feb. 21, 2019

The San Gorgonio Pass wind farm in Palm Springs, Calif., Jan. 6.
The San Gorgonio Pass wind farm in Palm Springs, Calif., Jan. 6. PHOTO: RUARIDH STEWART/ZUMA PRESS

The Democrats’ Green New Deal calls for a fully renewable electric power grid. Regardless of the economic or political challenges of bringing this about, it is likely technologically impossible.

An electric power grid involves second-by-second balancing between generated supply and consumer demand. In the case of a sudden imbalance—such as from the loss of a generator’s output—all the remaining generators on the grid instantaneously pool together. Each one pitches in a small part of the required power to make up for the lost generator fast enough to keep supply and demand balanced.

This doesn’t work for wind and solar because you can’t spontaneously increase wind or sunshine. Hydro power is limited and unevenly distributed around the country. And for safety reasons, nuclear power—even if the Green New Dealers accepted it—can’t be cranked up to neutralize imbalances. Nor can consumer demand be suddenly reduced enough.

Fossil-fuel turbines, by contrast, very naturally compensate for sudden supply outages. The inertia of the spinning mass of rotors provides the extra energy needed to compensate for the loss for the first few seconds. (Wind-rotor inertia is too short-lived.) Meanwhile the generators’ on-line reserve capacity kicks in, giving a rapid boost in power output to prevent the turbines from slowing down. That substitute power, called “governor response,” lasts as long as 15 minutes. During that time a single replacement generator ramps up to compensate entirely for the loss. All the turbines on the grid are thereby restored to their original speed, and the governor response is rearmed for the next disturbance.

An all-renewables grid would require prohibitively expensive battery storage to compensate for sudden power losses. Even with batteries, the lost power would have to be fed through “inverters”—a technology that converts variable-wind-speed alternating current, solar-power direct current, and battery-power direct-current into alternating current—to allow for synthetic inertia and governor response in the case of a disruption.

Opinion: The Green New Deal Gets a Senate Vote

Opinion: The Green New Deal Gets a Senate Vote
Share

VIDEO — HOW THE U.S. AND ISRAEL SABOTAGED THE IRANIAN MISSILE PROGRAM

Monday, February 18th, 2019

 

Here’s one for the good guys !   Its about time !!!   Nancy
VIDEO 

How the US, Israel Sabotaged the Iranian Missile Program

BY CLARION PROJECT Sunday, February 17, 2019

Watch Ryan Mauro, the Director of the Clarion Intelligence Network & Shillman Fellow for Clarion Project, as he reacts to news that the U.S. sabotaged the Iranian missile program. How was it done and will it continue in the future?

Mauro also comments on the recent Warsaw conference and the accomplishments of the U.S.

 

Share

TECHNOLOGY VERSUS THE WALL

Monday, February 4th, 2019

 

Has anyone suggested “armed drones”  ?  They would certainly get the attention of
those who are illegally crossing our border !   Nancy

Democrats who killed Bush’s ‘virtual fence’ now back ‘technological wall’ at border

by S. A. Miller

January 13, 2019
Bush’ ‘virtual fence’ killed by Obama

The Department of Homeland Security spent seven years and more than $1 billion trying to create a wall of technology at the border — or, as President George W. Bush called it, a “virtual fence.” It was a bust.

Now the idea has returned as the main ante for congressional Democrats in the border security spending fight. Opposed to President Trump’s physical barriers, they say drones, sensors and other electronics are all the tools needed — a “technological wall,” in the words of House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, California Democrat.

The Obama administration in 2011 pulled the plug on the Bush-era Secure Border Initiative Network, or SBINet, which was envisioned as an integrated system of radar, sensors and video cameras along the entire U.S.-Mexico border.

Democrats at the time cheered the decision to cancel the contract with Boeing for the long-troubled program.

Rep. Bennie G. Thompson, a Mississippi Democrat who was the ranking member of the House Homeland Security Committee, called SBINet a “grave and expensive disappointment” for squandering a little more than $1 billion to achieve just 53 miles of coverage on the border in Arizona.

Mr. Thompson, who now chairs the committee, said last week that he is ready to try again rather than spend on Mr. Trump’s corrugated steel fence.

“I have been engaging the tech community. They are telling me that they are developing modern technology that will help us identify those vulnerabilities. I would like for us to go in that direction,” he said on “PBS NewsHour.”

He said U.S. Customs and Border Protection already have high-tech sensors that just need to be used in a better way.

The Washington Times asked Mr. Thompson’s office what had changed since 2011 and whether he fully backed Mrs. Pelosi’s “technological wall.”

“He does support proven and effective technology to be used at the border where appropriate. SBINet simply did not work, was not deployed correctly and was overly ambitious,” said Thompson spokesman Adam Comis.

The border security debate and Mr. Trump’s demand for $5.7 billion for a border fence are at the heart of the standoff between the White House and Democrats that has kept the government partially shut down for more than three weeks.

Border security analysts agree that the technology has improved by leaps and bounds since 2011, but they disagree on whether sensors and remote imaging can substitute for physical barriers.

Jay F. Nunamaker Jr., director of the National Center for Border Security and Immigration at the University of Arizona, had no doubt that technology could replace walls and fences.

“The combination of all the cameras, night vision cameras, you could see people walking through marshes and streams like it was bright daylight,” he said, recalling a 2013 visit to a border security command center set up at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base in Tucson.

“Technology has only improved since then,” he said.

National security scholar James R. Phelps, co-author of the 2014 book “Border Security,” said the question isn’t whether the technology works in detecting border jumpers — it does.

“The question then becomes, ‘Do they actually stop anybody?’ The answer to that is no,” he said. “It is definitely not a substitute. It works in conjunction with physical barriers.”

A big difference between sensors and fences, he said, is where Border Patrol agents apprehend smugglers or illegal immigrants. The high-tech sensors and video cameras don’t prevent or hamper illegal border crossings.

“Once they are on U.S. soil, inside the United States of America, you now have to go through all the legal processes and administrative processes,” said Mr. Phelps. “You have to determine if they are here legally or illegally, collect the biometrics to put through the criminal check systems, detain them or arrest them, set them up for a deportation hearing, put them in front of a judge, potentially house them, treat them medically. The list goes on and on and on — with all the expenses associated with that person once they set foot in the United States.”

The scenario also depends on Border Patrol agents apprehending border jumpers after they appear on video screens.

“It does no good to detect illegal crossings unless someone is available to track them down, and fairly quickly, before the crossers disappear into the many private homes, farms, businesses, vehicles and natural hiding places that are in the border areas, often very close to the border,” said Jessica M. Vaughan, director of policy studies at the Center for Immigration Studies. “Technology by itself does not prevent anyone from crossing the way a real wall or fence does.”

(more…)

Share

AMERICAN MILITARY SUPERIORITY ‘SERIOUSLY ERODED’

Sunday, February 3rd, 2019

 

American Military Superiority ‘Seriously Eroded’

BY CLARION PROJECT Sunday, February 3, 2019

A US soldier stands at the Qayyarah military base during the ongoing operation to recapture the last major Iraqi city under the control of the Islamic State (IS) group jihadists in October 2016 (Photo: YASIN AKGUL/AFP/Getty Images)American military superiority has eroded seriously in the last decades. This was the conclusion of the latest report by the National Defense Strategy Commission, a bipartisan body charged by Congress to evaluate the U.S.’ defense capabilities.

The commission said the erosion was to such a “dangerous degree” that “America’s ability to defend its allies, its partners, and its own vital interests is increasingly in doubt.”

The report further stated, “If the nation does not act promptly to remedy these circumstances, the consequences will be grave and lasting.”

It notes that due to the superiority of American military power in the past, the U.S.:

  • has deterred or defeated aggression and preserved stability in key regions around the globe
  • ensured freedoms around the globe on which American and international prosperity depends
  • given America unrivaled access and influence
  • prevented America from being coerced or intimidated
  • helped to avert a recurrence of the devastating global wars of the early 20th century, which required repeated interventions at a cost of hundreds of thousands of U.S. lives

“Put simply,” the report states, “U.S. military power has been indispensable to global peace and stability—and to America’s own security, prosperity, and global leadership.”

One of the main reasons America has seen its military edge slip away is budgetary cuts, which have prevented “essential … modernization” that have contributed to shortfalls in readiness.

(more…)

Share

CYBERATTACKS – STRIKE BACK AGAINST EACH ONE

Tuesday, January 29th, 2019

 

Experts say our future  wars will not be fought with tanks. ships  and planes but will be cyber warfare.  We had better be ready.  Nancy
 
THE WALL STREET JOURNAL

Strike Back Against Every Cyberattack

The U.S. can keep foreign hacks at bay by showing its ability and will to retaliate.

Jan. 27, 2019

EXCERPT FROM THIS ARTICLE: 

Washington should commit to use its weapons against all aggressors. One example of America’s potential is Stuxnet, a U.S.- and Israeli-made virus that in 2007 infected Iran’s uranium-enrichment centrifuges, causing them to spin out of control. Stuxnet was certainly an offensive cyberweapon, but not a retaliatory one.

The U.S. really needs a second-strike cyberweapons program. In December 2015 the Russians launched cyberattacks on Ukraine, shutting down three power plants (which ran on Windows PCs). The U.S. should have immediately flickered all the lights in Moscow, to show them we can. Meddle in our elections? Fill Russia’s VK social network with endless Beto O’Rourke dental videos—it’s only fair. When the Chinese stole plans for the F-35 stealth fighter fromLockheed , we should have made every traffic light in Shanghai blink red, announcing “Stop, Don’t Hack Us Again.” North Korea’s Sonyhack? Scramble state-run TV signals in Pyongyang. They’ll get the message.

 

Another week, another data breach. The latest is 773 million online accounts for sale, many with passwords included, known as Collection #1. More are likely to come—go ahead and check your status at HaveIBeenPwned.com. All this the same month Marriott admitted that five million unencrypted passport numbers were snatched from its system, probably by the Chinese. Oh, and the Russians might have hacked the Democratic National Committee again after the 2018 midterms. How do we stop this?

The foreign hacks are the most disturbing. Last month members of a Chinese espionage ring known as Advanced Persistent Threat Group 10 (a k a “Godkiller” and “Stone Panda”) were charged by the Justice Department with hacking NASA, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and even IBM . Earlier last year the Chinese were caught stealing submarine data from a U.S. Navy contractor. And horror of horrors, in 2017 an Iranian national hacked HBO and threatened to release unaired episodes and plot summaries from “Game of Thrones.”

The U.S. has done close to nothing in response. Sure, special counsel Robert Mueller indicted 12 Russian intelligence officers last summer. I’m sure they’re quaking in their boots. Maybe those “Game of Thrones” episodes could have taught our leaders something about retaliation and revenge.

So what is America’s policy? That’s unclear. But a good start would be to heed the words of Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, who told the press last week that his state has a permanent policy of hurting “everyone who is trying to hurt us.” The U.S. needs a similar stance to halt cyberattacks.

(more…)
Share

CALL YOUR ELECTED OFFICIALS TO SUPPORT THE WALL

Wednesday, January 9th, 2019

 

If you feel strongly that our country needs a secure border and that the border wall should be funded and built, call your senators and representatives in congress and let them know.  You will be able to locate the contact information for your individual officials on the following link.   President Trump needs our support on this critical issue. Call tomorrow !  Please forward this information to your email lists.  Nancy
Share

VIDEOS TRIPLE AMPUTEE VET – FACEBOOK PULLED HIS FB PAGE

Tuesday, January 8th, 2019

 

 

Subject: TRIPLE AMPUTEE VET goes to Nancy P’s Office to collect HER $1

 

TRIPLE AMPUTEE…Brian seeking Nancy Pelosi…1st link;  2nd link is interview with Mike Huckabee…he is Highly decorated Vet.see his medals on his left chest!

He loves our country…has no legs and 1 arm…can’t run after his children for fun. And, Facebook PULLED HIS FB page…!

 

 

youtu.be/afNl7Ur-RRI

 

www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ht5337bsx4I

 

 

 

Share

‘DRILL, BABY, DRILL !’ Palin Was Right

Sunday, December 2nd, 2018

 

AMERICAN THINKER

Palin Was Right: ‘Drill, Baby, Drill!’

Daniel John Sobieski is a freelance writer whose pieces have appeared in Investor’s Business DailyHuman Events, Reason Magazine and the Chicago Sun-Times among other publications.

Like the rooster that takes credit for the sunrise, President Barack “You Didn’t Build That” Obama woke up the other day and decided to take credit for another thing he had nothing to do with. The president who said that companies like Solyndra were the hallmark of a future in which workers drove Chevy Volts, predicted that manufacturing jobs of the past could not be brought back, not only took credit for an economy he didn’t build, but also for the energy boom he opposed which is fueling it.

Back in 2012, geologist Barack Obama, poster child for the “peak oil” crowd,  told us that calling for increased production as Alaskan Gov. Sarah Palin did. by increased drilling – “drill, baby, drill,” she called it — was not a plan, but rather “a bumper sticker.”  Obama assured us, “You know, we can’t just drill our way to lower gas prices,”

Well we have, just as those manufacturing jobs that weren’t coming back have come back. So now Obama would have us forget what he said about the fuels of  the past, as he massaged his ego one more time:

Former President Barack Obama on Tuesday took credit for booming U.S. oil and gas production, telling investors to “say thank you” to him.

Obama spoke in Houston at an event hosted by Rice University’s Baker Institute, where he praised his administration’s commitment to the Paris climate agreement before taking credit for the United States being the biggest producer of oil and gas during his administration.

 

“I was extraordinarily proud of the Paris accords because — you know, I know we’re in oil country and we need American energy, and by the way, American energy production,” Obama said.

“You wouldn’t always know it, but it went up every year I was president. That whole, suddenly America’s like the biggest oil producer and the biggest gas — that was me, people.”

Sorry, Barack, but the man who blocked the Keystone XL and Dakota Access pipelines doesn’t get to take credit for the oil that soon will be running through both. Nor is the president who opposed two technologies developed by private industry, fracking and horizontal drilling, get to take credit for the abundance They have produced,

 

Obama tried to kill off fracking with a rule designed to burden the oil industry with excessive reporting requirements which would allow the EPA to delay and derail new exploration and drilling. It was designed to kill fracking, a key part of America’s energy resurgence, based on unfounded environmentalist fears, namely that fracking poisons drinking water, accelerates climate change, and causes earthquakes. As Investor’s Business Daily commented on the Obama fracking rule enacted in 2015: 

(more…)

Share

RARE EARTH MINERALS – CRITICAL TO OUR COUNTRY

Saturday, December 1st, 2018

 

Our country needs to be self-sufficient in the mining and production of rare earth minerals that are critical to high-tech applications, including military equipment.   We only have one rare earth mine in this country  and it is crucial to keep this mine in operation.  If ever there was a good reason to subsidize an industry, this is it !  China controls the needed rare earth minerals and could use them as a bargaining chip if tensions continue to escalate between our countries.    It has been said that a country is as strong as its weakest link and rare earth minerals is definitely one of our weak links !   Nancy
THE WALL STREET JOURNAL
PRIZED ‘RARE EARTH’ MINERALS FEEL SCORCH OF TARIFFS
Friday, November 30, 2018

By 

Timothy Puko | Photographs and video by Roger Kisby for The Wall Street Journal

 

Two Trump-administration policies have put a “rare earth” minerals mine in California between a rock and a hard place.

Six months after a hedge fund controlled by 40-year-old financier James Litinsky became majority owner of the Mountain Pass mine and brought it out of bankruptcy, President Trump announced an executive order that would seem like its golden ticket: The U.S. should stop buying key minerals overseas, and instead promote domestic supplies, as a matter of national security.

Mountain Pass is the only current U.S. source of rare earths—critical to high-tech applications, including military equipment. Mr. Litinsky’s mine stood to benefit from any resulting increase in demand from the new U.S. policy, announced in December 2017.

James Litinsky, head of JHL Capital Group, which has a majority stake in MP Materials, the business running the U.S.’s only rare-earth mining facility, in Mountain Pass, Calif.
James Litinsky, head of JHL Capital Group, which has a majority stake in MP Materials, the business running the U.S.’s only rare-earth mining facility, in Mountain Pass, Calif.
Share
Search All Posts
Categories