Archive for the ‘Ronald Reagan’ Category

TED KENNEDY AND THE KGB

Thursday, July 27th, 2017

 

FRONT PAGE MAGAZINE

TED KENNEDY AND THE KGB 

A reflection on the late Democratic Senator’s outreach to the Kremlin to undermine President Reagan.

 

Jamie Glazov is Frontpage Magazine’s editor. He holds a Ph.D. in History with a specialty in Russian, U.S. and Canadian foreign policy. He is the author of the critically-acclaimed and best-selling, United in Hate: The Left’s Romance with Tyranny and Terror and the host of the web-TV show, The Glazov Gang. He can be reached at jamieglazov11@gmail.com. Visit his site atJamieGlazov.com.

Editors’ note: In light of the ongoing controversy surrounding the Trump campaign’s alleged “collusion” with the Russian government during the 2016 US presidential election, which now involves Trump Jr. daring to talk to a Russian woman, Frontpage has deemed it important to bring attention to a forgotten story of verifiable scheming with the Kremlin — by the late Democratic Sen. Ted Kennedy against President Ronald Reagan. We are reprinting below Frontpage editor Jamie Glazov’s 2008 interview with Dr. Paul Kengor, who unearthed documentation detailing Kennedy’s outreach to the KGB and Soviet leader Yuri Andropov during the height of the Cold War, in which the Democratic Senator offered to collude with the Soviets to undermine President Reagan.

Ted Kennedy and the KGB.
Frontpage Magazine, May 15, 2008.

Frontpage Interview’s guest today is Paul Kengor, the author of the New York Times extended-list bestsellerGod and Ronald Reagan as well as God and George W. Bush and The Crusader: Ronald Reagan and the Fall of Communism. He is also the author of the first spiritual biography of the former first lady, God and Hillary Clinton: A Spiritual Life. He is a professor of political science and director of the Center for Vision and Values at Grove City College.

FP: Paul Kengor, welcome back to Frontpage Interview.

Kengor: Always great to be back, Jamie.

FP: We’re here today to revisit Ted Kennedy’s reaching out to the KGB during the Reagan period. Refresh our readers’ memories a bit.

Kengor: The episode is based on a document produced 25 years ago this week. I discussed it with you in our earlier interview back in November 2006. In my book, The Crusader: Ronald Reagan and the Fall of Communism, I presented a rather eye-opening May 14, 1983 KGB document on Ted Kennedy. The entire document, unedited, unabridged, is printed in the book, as well as all the documentation affirming its authenticity. Even with that, today, almost 25 years later, it seems to have largely remained a secret.

FP: Tell us about this document.

Kengor: It was a May 14, 1983 letter from the head of the KGB, Viktor Chebrikov, to the head of the USSR, the odious Yuri Andropov, with the highest level of classification. Chebrikov relayed to Andropov an offer from Senator Ted Kennedy, presented by Kennedy’s old friend and law-school buddy, John Tunney, a former Democratic senator from California, to reach out to the Soviet leadership at the height of a very hot time in the Cold War. According to Chebrikov, Kennedy was deeply troubled by the deteriorating relationship between the United States and the Soviet Union, which he believed was bringing us perilously close to nuclear confrontation. Kennedy, according to Chebrikov, blamed this situation not on the Soviet leadership but on the American president—Ronald Reagan. Not only was the USSR not to blame, but, said Chebrikov, Kennedy was, quite the contrary, “very impressed” with Andropov.

The thrust of the letter is that Reagan had to be stopped, meaning his alleged aggressive defense policies, which then ranged from the Pershing IIs to the MX to SDI, and even his re-election bid, needed to be stopped. It was Ronald Reagan who was the hindrance to peace. That view of Reagan is consistent with things that Kennedy said and wrote at the time, including articles in sources like Rolling Stone (March 1984) and in a speeches like his March 24, 1983 remarks on the Senate floor the day after Reagan’s SDI speech, which he lambasted as “misleading Red-Scare tactics and reckless Star Wars schemes.”

 

Even m

(more…)

Share

TRUMP’S NUCLEAR TWEETS

Monday, January 16th, 2017

 

THE WEEKLY STANDARD

Trump’s Nuclear Tweets

What are the facts?
Robert Joseph was undersecretary of state for arms control and international security from 2005-2007; Eric Edelman was undersecretary of defense for policy, 2005-2009.

Of President-elect Trump’s tweets since winning the election, the one drawing the greatest criticism may well be his comment last week that the United States “must strengthen and expand its nuclear capability until such time as the world comes to its senses regarding nukes.” The next day, his critics went downright ballistic when the president-elect reportedly made the off-camera statement: “Let it be an arms race. .  .  . We will outmatch them at every pass and outlast them all.” The partisans at the Ploughshares Fund and their paid-for “echo-chamber” colleagues across the disarmament community were seething that Trump’s comments could touch off an arms race and undercut strategic stability, lowering the threshold for nuclear use, possibly leading to a global holocaust. But beyond the obvious hyperbole, what are the relevant facts?

Fact one: The nuclear arms race has been going on for more than a decade, but it has been primarily a one-nation race, by Russia—unless you count China, which has been aggressively modernizing its nuclear arsenal as well. Moscow has strengthened and expanded its nuclear capability across the board. It has maintained a broad array of warfighting systems, from nuclear-armed torpedoes to short- and medium-range missiles, including the development of new capabilities that violate the 1987 Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty. At the strategic level, Russia has modernized all three legs of its triad. It has deployed, or soon will, new mobile and heavy ICBMs as well as a new class of strategic ballistic missile submarines. It has begun testing a rail-mobile ICBM, raising the prospect that it will bring back an operational concept most thought had been abandoned with the end of the Cold War. It is modernizing the air-breathing force with new cruise missiles (already tested over Syria multiple times) and an advanced heavy bomber. Moreover, Russia is developing, and may have tested, an unprecedented new nuclear weapon—a nuclear-powered torpedo with an enormously large warhead, perhaps as large as 100 megatons, whose sole purpose would be to inflict massive civilian casualties and long-term ecological damage.

(more…)

Share

VIDEO – AGENDA, GRINDING AMERICA DOWN

Thursday, February 11th, 2016

 

So many are now asking, what is happening to our country?  The coarsening of our society is now evident  – divorce rates are soaring, families are crumbling and  Christianity is being attacked.   
Home schooling of children is increasing because many parents are dissatisfied  with the public schools as they feel they are providing inferior education.    The feminist agenda is pushing abortion on demand, parents are no longer informed when their underage child is having an abortion,  schools are passing out condoms to children, there are gay pride parades as if homosexuality is something to be celebrated. 
  The number of Americans on food stamps is at an all-time high.    Social Justice (also better known as Socialism is the taking from one group to give to another) is the new buzz word.  Dependency on government is taking the place of American self reliance.  The fibre of our country and its people is being ground down.  We are decaying from within ! 
What is happening to us ?  The answer to these and many more questions is in the following documentary  film.   Please share with your email lists.   Nancy 
VIDEO – AGENDA, Grinding  America Down 
Share

EDUCATION – THE END OF HISTORY, PART II

Friday, April 3rd, 2015

THE WALL STREET JOURNAL

The End of History, Part II

The new Advanced Placement U.S. history exam focuses on oppression, group identity and Reagan the warmonger

President Reagan speaking in West Berlin near the Brandenburg Gate, June 12, 1987.
President Reagan speaking in West Berlin near the Brandenburg Gate, June 12, 1987. Photo: AFP/Getty Images
By

Lynne V. CheneyMrs. Cheney, a senior fellow at the American Enterprise Institute, writes about history. Her most recent book is “James Madison: A Life Reconsidered” (Viking, 2014).

If you seek peace, if you seek prosperity for the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe, if you seek liberalization: Come here to this gate! Mr. Gorbachev, open this gate! Mr. Gorbachev, tear down this wall!

—President Ronald Reagan, speech at the Brandenburg Gate, Berlin, 1987

President Reagan’s challenge to Soviet Premier Mikhail Gorbachev remains one of the most dramatic calls for freedom in our time. Thus I was heartened to find a passage from Reagan’s speech on the sample of the new Advanced Placement U.S. history exam that students will take for the first time in May. It seemed for a moment that students would be encouraged to learn about positive aspects of our past rather than be directed to focus on the negative, as happens all too often.

But when I looked closer to see the purpose for which the quotation was used, I found that it is held up as an example of “increased assertiveness and bellicosity” on the part of the U.S. in the 1980s. That’s the answer to a multiple-choice question about what Reagan’s speech reflects.

No notice is taken of the connection the president made between freedom and human flourishing, no attention to the fact that within 2½ years of the speech, people were chipping off pieces of the Berlin Wall as souvenirs. Instead of acknowledging important ideas and historical context, test makers have reduced President Reagan’s most eloquent moment to warmongering.

The AP U.S. history exam matters. Half a million of the nation’s best and brightest high-school students will take it this year, hoping to use it to earn college credit and to polish their applications to competitive colleges. To score well on the exam, students have to learn what the College Board, a private organization that creates the exam, wants them to know. (more…)

Share

VIDEO – NEWT GINGRICH – ISLAMIC THREAT AND AMERICA’S SURVIVAL

Friday, February 6th, 2015

January 24, 2015 Iowa Freedom Summit

Share

VIDEO – PRESIDENT REAGAN’S SPEECH TO THE NATION – SPACESHIP CHALLENGER DISASTER – JANUARY 28, 1986

Thursday, January 29th, 2015

TODAY IS THE ANNIVERSARY OF PRESIDENT RONALD REAGAN’S SPEECH TO THE NATION – THE SPACESHIP CHALLENGER DISASTER – JANUARY 28, 1986

Share

BARRY GOLDWATER’S GOLDEN ANNIVERSARY

Wednesday, December 3rd, 2014

 

THE WASHINGTON TIMES
GOLDWATER’S GOLDEN

Conservatives celebrate 50 years of movement he ignited

In their hearts, they know he’s still right — and could likely teach the nation a thing or two in these dire days.

November 18, 2014

by Jennifer Harper

 

EXCERPT FROM THIS ARTICLE:  “This 50-year anniversary is momentous as it launched the American conservative movement with the nomination of Barry Goldwater and the rise of Ronald Reagan. All modern history runs through this prism. Before 1964, conservatism was dismissed by liberals as a ‘rash of irritable mental gestures’ — and all sophisticated people believed that government could solve everything,” said Craig Shirley, a Reagan historian and author.

“The results of the midterms plus the elections of Reagan, the Gingrich congresses and the tea party revolution, the rise of Fox News, Newsmax, Breitbart and hundreds of other examples show that argument is over. Or at least it should be. However, there are still elements in the GOP — neocons, High Tories and big-government Republicans — who embrace Bushism over Reaganism. They are Republicans, yes, but they are not American conservatives. They are more akin to philosopher Edmund Burke, who believed in top-down governance,” Mr. Shirley observed.

“True American conservatives — like Goldwater, Reagan, William F. Buckley and others — always championed the individual over the state and over corporatism. They believe in bottom-up governance. As did the framers. This difference between Jeffersonian conservatives and Burkean rightists is as different as night and day. This fight is raging today, and that is why this anniversary celebrating Goldwater is so important,” he said. (more…)

Share

Sunday, August 10th, 2014

 

 

Published on The Weekly Standard (www.weeklystandard.com)

Frozen in the Cold War

The roots of Obama’s weakness abroad

Matthew Continetti

August 4, 2014, Vol. 19, No. 44

EXCERPT FROM THIS ARTICLE:  It’s easy to forget, but Obama devotes most of the chapter on foreign policy in The Audacity of Hope, his 2006 campaign book, to a survey of U.S. history. The chapter begins with a long description of growing up in Indonesia. Then Obama cites the most overworked quotations in public discourse: George Washington’s warning, in his Farewell Address, against “entangling alliances” and John Quincy Adams’s declaration, in his 1821 Independence Day speech, that the United States does not go abroad “in search of monsters to destroy.” Manifest Destiny, American imperialism, World War I, the Fourteen Points, interwar isolationism, World War II, and the beginnings of the United Nations all have a place in Obama’s story. 

He spends most of his time on the Cold War. Obama’s method is telling. He writes one sentence praising the cold warriors, and then devotes four pages to criticizing them. What Harry Truman, George Marshall, and Dean Acheson created in the aftermath of World War II is “a remarkable achievement,” he says, “perhaps the Greatest Generation’s greatest gift to us after the victory over fascism.” But don’t get carried away: America’s Cold War foreign policy, he says, “had its flaws and contradictions; it could fall victim to the distortions of politics, the sins of hubris, the corrupting effects of fear.”…………..

The further you go into Obama’s history of the Cold War, the more liberal shibboleths you encounter. It occurs to you that Obama is not studying anticommunism. He is engaging inanti-anticommunism. The main subject of his criticism isn’t the Communists, it’s the hardliners who fought them. He is paraphrasing, in milder language, the critique of U.S. foreign policy leveled by Howard Zinn, Noam Chomsky, and Gore Vidal.

In 1983, Barack Obama was a senior at Columbia University. He was not well known. He lived off-campus, had a few close friends, and spent a lot of time reading. He went to some meetings of the Black Students Association, but no one remembers seeing him there. He majored in political science, with a concentration in international relations, and classmates and professors say he was an attentive and intelligent student.

But he was not an active participant in student life. He was not a student radical. He did not go on a hunger strike. He did not storm any administration buildings. One friend, in an interview with biographer David Maraniss, likened Obama to the protagonist of Walker Percy’s The Moviegoer: a passive observer. (more…)

Share

OBAMA VS. REAGAN’S REACTION TO A DOWNED AIRLINER BY RUSSIA

Monday, July 21st, 2014

 

Compare the difference between President Obama’s  “mention” of the downing of the Malaysian airliner to Ronald Reagan’s Address to the Nation in 1983.     Nancy
WALL STREET JOURNAL     July 18, 2014
PRESIDENT RONALD REAGAN’S ADDRESS TO THE NATION

From an address to the nation by President Ronald Reagan on Sept. 5, 1983, after Korean Air Lines Flight 007 was shot down by a Soviet Su-15 interceptor:

I’m coming before you tonight about the Korean airline massacre, the attack by the Soviet Union against 269 innocent men, women, and children aboard an unarmed Korean passenger plane. This crime against humanity must never be forgotten, here or throughout the world.

. . . And make no mistake about it, this attack was not just against ourselves or the Republic of Korea. This was the Soviet Union against the world and the moral precepts which guide human relations among people everywhere. It was an act of barbarism, born of a society which wantonly disregards individual rights and the value of human life and seeks constantly to expand and dominate other nations.

They deny the deed, but in their conflicting and misleading protestations, the Soviets reveal that, yes, shooting down a plane—even one with hundreds of innocent men, women, children, and babies—is a part of their normal procedure if that plane is in what they claim as their airspace. They owe the world an apology and an offer to join the rest of the world in working out a system to protect against this ever happening again.

. . . We know it will be hard to make a nation that rules its own people through force to cease using force against the rest of the world. But we must try. This is not a role we sought. We preach no manifest destiny. But like Americans who began this country and brought forth this last, best hope of mankind, history has asked much of the Americans of our own time. Much we have already given; much more we must be prepared to give.

Let us have faith, in Abraham Lincoln’s words, “that right makes might, and in that faith let us, to the end dare to do our duty as we understand it.” If we do, if we stand together and move forward with courage, then history will record that some good did come from this monstrous wrong that we will carry with us and remember for the rest of our lives.

Share

PRESIDENT RONALD REAGAN’S 4TH OF JULY MESSAGE 1981

Thursday, July 3rd, 2014

 

THE WALL STREET JOURNAL
July 2, 2014
From President Reagan’s “Message on the Observance of Independence Day, 1981”:

Today, all over America, families and friends are reuniting to renew ties, enjoy each other’s company, and celebrate our Nation’s birthday. It is a day when liberty and laughter go hand-in-hand—when we can acknowledge that, oh yes, we have our faults, and lots of problems, too, but we’re happy and proud because we’re free, and we know the best of America is yet to be. . . .

Back in 1776, John Adams wrote his wife Abigail that the anniversary of our independence should be observed with great fanfare: “. . . with pomp and parades . . . shows and games . . . and sports and guns and bells . . . with bonfires and illuminations, from one end of this continent to the other, and from this time forevermore.”

Well, Mr. Adams, rest assured that what you wanted is being done. Your traditions are now ours, and we guard them like national treasures. And you know why. When we unfurl our flags, strike up the bands, and light up the skies each July 4th, we celebrate the most exciting, ongoing adventure in human freedom the world has ever known.

What makes our revolution unique and so exciting . . . is that it changed the very concept of government. Here was a new nation telling the world that it was conceived in liberty; that all men are created equal with God-given rights, and that power ultimately resides in “We the people.”

We sometimes forget this great truth, and we never should, because putting people first has always been America’s secret weapon. It’s the way we’ve kept the spirit of our revolution alive—a spirit that drives us to dream and dare, and take great risks for a greater good. It’s the spirit of Fulton and Ford, the Wright brothers and Lindbergh, and of all our astronauts. It’s the spirit of Joe Louis, Babe Ruth, and a million others who may have been born poor, but who would not be denied their day in the Sun.

Well, I’m convinced that we’re getting that spirit back. The Nation is pulling together. We’re looking to the future with new hope and confidence—and we know we can make America great again by putting the destiny of this Nation back in the hands of the people. And why shouldn’t we? Because, after all, we are Americans.

 

 

Share
Search All Posts
Categories