Archive for the ‘Ronald Reagan’ Category

U.S. FINANCING CHINA’S WORLD DOMINATION PLANS

Friday, November 15th, 2019

 

This is an article you have to read as there is so much new information in it regarding China and how our financial markets are being used to finance China’s expansion of their technological and military advances.  Nancy
IMPRIMIS – HILLSDALE COLLEGE

Why and How the U.S. Should Stop Financing China’s Bad Actors

October 2019  • Volume 48, Number 10 • Roger W. Robinson, Jr.

Roger W. Robinson, Jr.
Chairman, Prague Security Studies Institute

Roger W. Robinson, Jr. is president and CEO of RWR Advisory Group and co-founder and chairman of the Prague Security Studies Institute. He earned a B.A. from Duke University and an M.A. from George Washington University. He served as senior director of international economic affairs on President Reagan’s National Security Council, where he was the principal architect of the secret economic and financial strategy that proved decisive to the defeat of the Soviet Union. He later served as chairman of the Congressional U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Commission. Prior to his government service, he was a vice president in the international department of the Chase Manhattan Bank.

The following is adapted from a speech delivered at Hillsdale College on September 9, 2019, during a conference on the topic, “Understanding China.”

In the early 1980s, I served on President Reagan’s National Security Council. Prior to my time at the White House, I was a vice president at Chase Manhattan Bank, in charge of its USSR and Eastern Europe division. It was my job to assess the creditworthiness of the countries in that part of the world, and I had come to realize that the Soviet Union had relatively modest hard currency income—and that what little it had came largely from the West.

In 1982, the Soviets had an empire stretching from Havana to Hanoi, but their hard currency revenue totaled only about $32 billion a year—roughly one-third the annual revenue of General Motors at the time. They were spending about $16 billion more annually than they were making, with the funding gap—the USSR’s life support—being financed by Western governments and banks.

President Reagan had long believed that the Soviet Union was economically vulnerable, because he knew it lacked the entrepreneurship, technological dynamism, and freedoms that are the prerequisites of a strong modern economy. And when he learned that we in the West were financing its brutal regime, he committed to slowing, and ultimately terminating, that flow of discretionary cash.

Our European allies had a completely different approach. Their belief in Ostpolitik, as the Germans called it, presupposed that commercial bridge-building would lead to geopolitical cooperation. If the West would offer financing and trade with the Soviets, peace and prosperity would result. Meanwhile, the Soviets were using the proceeds of Western loans, hard currency revenue streams, and technological support to build up their military, expand their empire, and engage in anti-Western activities.

The Reagan administration drew the line on a project called the Siberian Gas Pipeline, a 3,600-mile twin-strand pipeline that stretched from Siberia into the Western European gas grid. If completed, not only would it become the centerpiece of the Soviets’ hard currency earnings structure, but Western Europe would become dependent on the USSR for over 70 percent of its natural gas, weakening Western Europe’s ties to the U.S. and leaving the continent open to Kremlin extortion. Moreover, the pipeline was being financed on taxpayer-subsidized terms, since France and Germany viewed the USSR as a less developed country worthy of below-market interest rates.

The U.S. at the time had a monopoly on oil and gas technology that could drill through permafrost—which we had developed for Alaska’s North Slopeand we imposed oil and gas equipment sanctions on the USSR and European companies that were helping to build the Siberian pipeline. At one point, despite the strain it placed on relations with our NATO allies, we closed the U.S. market entirely to companies that continued to supply the pipeline project over our objections. Four of the six affected companies went under within six months, and Europeans woke up to the fact that they could do business with us or the Soviets, but not both.

As a result of these efforts we capped Soviet gas deliveries to Western Europe at 30 percent of total supplies, delayed the first strand of the pipeline by years and killed the second strand, and eventually helped dry up the bulk of Western credits to the USSR. In a secret deal, we also persuaded the Saudis to pump an additional two million barrels of oil per day and decontrolled prices at the wellhead in this country, knocking oil prices down to about $10 a barrel—significant because for every dollar decrease in the price of a barrel, the Soviets lost some 500 million to one billion dollars. In short, the Soviet Union never recovered from these economic and financial blows. It defaulted on some $96 billion in Western hard currency debt shortly before the total collapse of the Soviet empire.

The story with China today has certain similarities, but with one big difference: the U.S. has been playing the role of the naïve Europeans. Since adopting the Kissinger policy of engaging with China in the 1970s, our government has operated on the assumption that economic and financial relations with China would lead Beijing to liberalize politically. And since 2001, when we backed China’s entry into the World Trade Organization, the pace at which we have given China access to our best technology and capital and trade markets has accelerated. Yet China has shown no signs of embracing individual freedoms or the rule of law.

Instead, with our support, the Chinese have launched a massive campaign to become the world’s leading superpower. We know about the “Belt and Road Initiative,” a strategic undertaking to place huge segments of the world under China’s influence or outright control. We know about “Made in China 2025,” a strategy designed to dominate key technology sectors—from artificial intelligence and quantum computing to hypersonic missiles and 5G. We know about China’s practice of forced technology transfers: requiring American companies to share their trade secrets and R&D in order to do business in China. We know about China’s predatory trade practices. We know many of these things only because President Trump has brought them to the forefront of national attention, for which he deserves credit. And the ongoing tariff war is a good thing in the sense that we’ve finally begun to take a stand.

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IS PRESIDENT TRUMP DRAINING THE SWAMP ?

Saturday, August 31st, 2019

 

Aug 28, 2019, 11:33am

A Progress Report – Is President Donald Trump “Draining the Swamp?”

By 

Policy

Recently released federal payroll numbers from the end of fiscal year 2018 show that President Trump is working to fulfill his campaign promises to protect the country, defend the border, and deliver healthcare to our veterans.

In order to deliver on these assurances, the administration sharply increased payroll headcounts at the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and Veterans Affairs (VA). Collectively, these agencies added 39,208 new employees since 2016.

The president also promised deep cuts in regulations and bureaucracy to spur economic growth. Our auditors at OpenTheBooks.com found 34,640 positions eliminated within the traditional paper-pushing, tax, and regulatory agencies: Education, Health & Human Services, EPA, IRS, Interior, and 114 others.

Statistically speaking, the Trump re-prioritization of the government occurred without a material increase in the number of employees. In his first two-years, the bureaucracy grew by 3,685 staffers and now stands at an all-time high of 1.35 million. However, that’s only one-quarter of one-percent growth (0.27%).

Headcounts of the federal executive agencies since 2010. Accurate cash compensation totals in 2017 and 2018 have not been released by the Office of Personnel Management subject to our OpenTheBooks.com FOIA requests. The Defense Department does not release their payroll either.

Headcounts of the federal executive agencies since 2010. Accurate cash compensation totals in 2017 and 2018 have not been released by the Office of Personnel Management subject to our OpenTheBooks.com FOIA requests. The Defense Department does not release their payroll either.

OPENTHEBOOKS.COM

Today In: Business

Here’s how the payroll head count breaks down in five key departments where the average employee salary plus bonus exceeds $100,000:

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VIDEO – DEMOCRATIC SOCIALISM EXPLAINED

Thursday, August 1st, 2019

 

This is an excellent video that explains exactly how  Democratic Socialism,  Socialism, and Communism are all connected.   Dr. Kengor is speaking to a group of Young Americans  at the Reagan Ranch. Please share with your email lists.    Nancy   

VIDEO –  DEMOCRATIC SOCIALISM EXPLAINED

Dr. Paul Kengor 

Biography
Paul Kengor
From your friends at the Institute for Faith and Freedom

PIG

 

What is “democratic socialism” and what makes it different than socialism or communism? In a speech at the Ronald Reagan Ranch in Santa Barbara, CA, Dr. Paul Kengor unpacks this complex leftist ideology, putting all the pieces on the table.

Click here to watch this video on our website to get the facts you need to have:

 

WATCH NOW!
 

Enjoy,

The Institute for Faith and Freedom

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VIDEO PRESIDENT RONALD REAGAN’S MEMORIAL DAY SPEECH 1986

Tuesday, May 28th, 2019

 

VIDEO   PRESIDENT RONALD REAGAN   MEMORIAL DAY SPEECH  1986 

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OBAMA’S NARCISSISTIC MONUMENT

Monday, April 15th, 2019

 

If you are even remotely interested in seeing the grandiose photos  for the proposed  Obama Center (not library), there is a  link at the end of the article  to see the photos.  It never ends with this man !   Nancy
WASHINGTON EXAMINER

Obama’s narcissism gets its monument

BY Philip Terzian   March 22, 2019
EXCERPT FROM THIS ARTICLE: By contrast, at the forthcoming Barack Obama Presidential Center in Chicago, for which ground will be broken later this year, things will be quite different. To begin with, it is the Obama “center” and not the Obama “library” because it is not, in fact, a library at all: There will be no books, no presidential papers or documents, nor printed matter of any kind related to the Obama presidency, except for, presumably, what’s on sale at the gift shop.

There will be no cables, no memoranda or manuscripts, no official records of the presidency it’s designed to celebrate. The Barack Obama Presidential Center will not be a historical archive, scholarly resource, or even museum, so much as a vast, 33-acre monument to Obama, spread over multiple structures and a manicured landscape.

Most startling of all, the unclassified papers of the Obama administration, the ostensible purpose of any presidential library, will repose not in Chicago but in a distant federal warehouse, digitized for online access but otherwise inconvenient and inaccessible.

 

Presidential libraries are many things.

They’re repositories of the official papers and, in many cases, the personal archives and artifacts of our nation’s chief executives, as well as those of their families, friends, and colleagues in public service. And as the name would suggest, they are also home to vast collections of books, articles, dissertations, monographs, and journals about their subject or the presidency in general. They’re a scholar’s dream for historians, researchers, and students alike. If you’re seeking to understand, say, Harry S. Truman’s diplomacy or Ronald Reagan’s life before politics, a journey to Independence, Mo., or Simi Valley, Calif., is probably obligatory.

In recent decades, they’ve expanded their purview. Since the advent of Jimmy Carter’s eponymous center in Atlanta, they double as the site of think tanks, foundations, or institutes intended to continue the public work of retired or deceased presidents. Some are located at birthplaces or boyhood homes, which are of interest in themselves, or on college campuses, where their presence may evoke mixed sentiments. They are conference centers, ceremonial and mortuary sites, and, above all, tourist destinations featuring well-stocked museums, rotating exhibitions, troops of visiting schoolchildren, and capacious gift shops.

At the John F. Kennedy library alongside Boston Harbor, you can see a replica of his Oval Office, complete with rocking chair, and at the Reagan library in sunny Southern California, there’s a two-story fragment of the Berlin Wall on an outside terrace.

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VIDEO – MARK LEVIN ON HANNITY – CORRUPTION

Monday, April 1st, 2019

 

VIDEO – MARK LEVIN ON SEAN HANNITY, FRIDAY, MARCH 29, 2019

Mark Levin gives a very informative history of how past  Democrat presidents (FDR, Woodrow Wilson, Johnson, Kennedy, and Obama  used their powers to spy on their political enemies by using the IRS, the Justice Department and the FBI.   He questions how it could be possible that Obama did not know that his people in the Justice Department, the FBI and the IRS (remember the IRS intimidating the tea party groups during the Obama Administration) were targeting  President Trump.    Mark Levin also  talks about the role that the media has played in covering up this  whole sordid coup against President Trump       Nancy
The Mark Levin segment on the Hannity video begins at 22:18
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VIDEO – EXCLUSIVE VIDEO FOR CPAC 2019

Wednesday, March 6th, 2019

 

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VIDEO -BRIT HUME – FOX NEWS – THE RISE, FALL AND FUTURE OF CONSERVATISM

Saturday, February 9th, 2019

 

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VIDEO MARK LEVIN WITH DR. PAUL KENGOR –

Friday, February 1st, 2019

 

 

Ted Kennedy and Russia  1983  and Soviet Spies in President Franklin Roosevelt’s administration

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HISTORICAL FACTS OF FORMER U.S. PRESIDENTS AND SUMMITS WITH RUSSIAN LEADERS

Wednesday, July 18th, 2018

 

This is a fascinating article regarding the history of former U.S. Presidents when they met with Russian leaders.  They make Trump look like a true statesman !!!   Nancy

Moscow’s Presidential Jackasses and Bootlickers

By Paul Kengor  July 18, 2018

Senator John McCain described the Trump-Putin press conference in Helsinki as “one of the most disgraceful performances by an American president in memory.” “No prior president,” insisted McCain, “has ever abased himself more abjectly before a tyrant.”

Easy there, senator. Your knowledge of meetings between American presidents and Moscow tyrants is apparently quite limited. Plenty of examples would suffice, but let’s start with the very first: FDR and Stalin.

In fact, where to begin with that case example? My colleague Daniel Flynn yesterday raised the specter of FDR at Yalta — a perfect illustration, but we can go earlier. I could expend thousands of words laying out FDR’s jaw-droppingly awful assessments of Stalin across multiple meetings, conferences, and correspondence. Some of these were spouted directly by FDR to the man he fondly called “Uncle Joe,” whereas others were shared by FDR advisers who begged the president not to trust Stalin.

One such adviser was William Bullitt, FDR’s first ambassador to the USSR, who once had been gushingly pro-Bolshevik — until he spent a few years in the Soviet Union, where he was awakened by the death stench that was Stalinism. As he did with so many advisers, FDR rejected Bullitt’s warnings: “Bill, I just have a hunch that Stalin is not that kind of man…. I think that if I give him everything I possibly can and ask nothing from him in return, noblesse oblige, he won’t try to annex anything and will work with me for a world of democracy and peace.”

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