Archive for the ‘Military’ Category

OUR DEPLETED MILITARY

Wednesday, June 21st, 2017

 

Congress and Obama Depleted the Military

The Trump budget would increase spending only 3%. With today’s threats, that’s not nearly enough.

U.S. and Australian soldiers at a military exercise in the Philippines, May 8. PHOTO:AFP/GETTY IMAGES

June 20, 2017

North Korea is making alarming progress in its ballistic-missile and nuclear-weapons programs. Russia and China are developing and fielding advanced weapons against which the U.S. may not be able to defend. Al Qaeda operates in more countries than ever. Islamic State is targeting the West and launching attacks throughout Europe and the Middle East. Iran is supporting terrorist organizations across the globe, modernizing its ballistic-missile and other capabilities and likely continuing to pursue nuclear weapons.

Defense Secretary Jim Mattis told the House Armed Services Committee last week that the U.S. is losing the military edge on which our security has long relied: “Today, every operating domain—including outer space, air, sea, undersea, land and cyberspace—is contested.”

Gen. Joseph Dunford, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, seconded that worry in written testimony for the same hearing: “Without sustained, sufficient and predictable funding,” he wrote, “I assess that within five years we will lose our ability to project power; the basis of how we defend the homeland, advance U.S. interests, and meet our alliance commitments.”

In short, the situation President Trump inherited is dire. America today faces an array of threats more serious and complex than at any time in the past 75 years.

(more…)

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VIDEO – GUANDOLO – KATHY GRIFFIN’S ISIS ROMANCE

Saturday, June 10th, 2017

 

VIDEO

Glazov Gang: Guandolo and Gaubatz on ‘Kathy Griffin’s ISIS Romance’

This new special edition of The Glazov Gang was joined by John Guandolo, President ofUnderstanding the Threat, and Chris Gaubatz, Vice President of Understanding The Threat.

John and Chris focused on Kathy Griffin’s ISIS Romance, reflecting on the Left’s heart of darkness.

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NORTH KOREA’S EMP THREAT

Saturday, June 10th, 2017

 

THE WALL STREET JOURNAL

North Korea Dreams of Turning Out the Lights

Pyongyang doesn’t need a perfect missile. Detonating a nuke above Seoul—or L.A.—would sow chaos.

June 9, 2017
A satellite photo of Korea illustrates the South’s dependence on electricity. PHOTO:NASA

Mr. Cooper was the U.S. ambassador to the Defense and Space Talks during the Reagan administration and director of the Strategic Defense Initiative during the George H.W. Bush administration.

Conventional wisdom holds that it will be years before North Korea can credibly threaten the United States with a nuclear attack. Kim Jong Un’s scientists are still testing only low-yield nuclear weapons, the thinking goes, and have yet to place them on ballistic missiles capable of reaching America’s West Coast.

While its technological shortcomings have been well documented, North Korea’s desire to provoke a nuclear conflict with the U.S. should not be minimized or ignored. Pyongyang is surely close to getting it right.

For South Korea the danger is more immediate. According to physicist David Albright, the founder and president of the Institute for Science and International Security, the North Koreans have between 13 and 30 nuclear weapons and can build as many as five more every year. If Mr. Kim were to detonate one of these bombs in the atmosphere 40 miles above Seoul, it could inflict catastrophic damage on South Korea’s electric power grid, leading to a prolonged blackout that could have deadly consequences.

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HOW THE MILITARY RATES OBAMA’S LEGACY

Sunday, June 4th, 2017

 

Please note that this article from the Military Times was written on January 8, 2017 at the very end of Obama’s term of office.  Nancy
HOW THE MILITARY RATES OBAMA’S LEGACY
By Leo Shane III and George R. Altman    January 8, 2017
President Barack Obama will step down after eight years as commander in chief with one of the most influential tenures leading the U.S. military, but not necessarily the political support of service members. 

His moves to slim down the armed forces, move away from traditional military might and overhaul social policies prohibiting the service of minority groups have proven divisive in the ranks. His critics have accused him of trading a strong security posture for political points, and for allowing the rise of terrorists like the Islamic State group whom the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan were supposed to silence.

But Obama’s supporters define him as the Nobel Peace Prize winner who ordered the elimination of Osama bin Laden and refocused military strategy while wrestling with an uncooperative Congress and unprecedented budget restrictions. They insist the military is more nimble now, and more prepared to deal with unconventional warfare against non-traditional threats across the globe.

More than half of troops surveyed in the latest Military Times/Institute for Veterans and Military Families poll said they have an unfavorable opinion of Obama and his two-terms leading the military. About 36 percent said they approve of his job as commander in chief. 

Their complaints include the president’s decision to decrease military personnel (71 percent think it should be higher), his moves to withdraw combat troops from Iraq (59 percent say it made America less safe) and his lack of focus on the biggest dangers facing America (64 percent say China represents a significant threat to the U.S.)

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VIDEO – JOHN GUANDOLO – TRUMP VS MUSLIM BROTHERHOOD INFILTRATION

Wednesday, May 31st, 2017

 

There is extremely important information in this video and in the Counter Jihad Report  below.   John Guandolo has twice been  a guest speaker at ICON and gave presentations on Muslim Brotherhood Infiltration and Sharia Law.  Nancy
VIDEO
Published on May 29, 2017

The Glazov Gang – John Guandolo on “Trump vs. Brotherhood

Infiltration.”

MORE DETAILED INFORMATION REGARDING

counterjihadreport.com/tag/john-guandolo/

John Guandolo Discusses the Muslim Brotherhood Threat in

America, Attacks the Media

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VIDEO – PRESIDENT TRUMP’S VISIT TO ARLINGTON CEMETERY ON MEMORIAL DAY

Tuesday, May 30th, 2017

 

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VICTOR DAVIS HANSON – ANCIENT LAWS, MODERN WARS

Monday, May 15th, 2017

 

Ancient Laws, Modern Wars

Victor Davis Hanson

4/6/2017 12:01:00 AM – Victor Davis Hanson

The most dangerous moments in foreign affairs often come after a major power seeks to reassert its lost deterrence.

The United States may be entering just such a perilous transitional period.

Rightly or wrongly, China, Iran, North Korea, Russia and Middle East-based terrorists concluded after 2009 that the U.S. saw itself in decline and preferred a recession from world affairs.

In that void, rival states were emboldened, assuming that America thought it could not — or should not — any longer exercise the sort of political and military leadership it had demonstrated in the past.

Enemies thought the U.S. was more focused on climate change, United Nations initiatives, resets, goodwill gestures to enemies such as Iran and Cuba, and soft-power race, class and gender agendas than on protecting and upholding longtime U.S. alliances and global rules.

In reaction, North Korea increased its missile launches and loudly promised nuclear destruction of the West and its allies.

Russia violated its obligations under the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty and absorbed borderlands of former Soviet republics.

(more…)

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THE TROOPS TRAIN TO REASSURE EUROPE

Monday, May 8th, 2017

 

 

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The Troops Train to Reassure Europe

The U.S. Army’s Dagger Brigade is preparing for a September deployment. But it’s stretched thin.

Dagger Brigade members completed the Danger Focus II training Feb. 16.

Dagger Brigade members completed the Danger Focus II training Feb. 16. PHOTO: 1ST INFANTRY DIVISION PUBLIC AFFAIRS

Fort Riley, Kan.

EXCERPT FROM THIS ARTICLE:  How did we get to this point? During the Cold War, the massive U.S. forces that patrolled the West German border—nearly a quarter-million soldiers strong—were the best-equipped and readiest in the Army. Today the “frontier of freedom” in Europe has moved 1,000 miles east and runs from the Baltic to the Black Sea, but U.S. forces have neither moved with it nor retained their size. Lt. Gen. Ben Hodges, who commands U.S. Army Europe, says his job is to make 30,000 troops “look like 300,000” to the Russians.

President Obama announced the European Reassurance Initiative (ERI) in 2014 to “reassure allies of the U.S. commitment to their security and territorial integrity as members of the NATO alliance.” The initiative promised increasingly large summer exercises with allied militaries and new “heel to toe” rotations of Army heavy brigade combat teams.

As usual, however, the Obama administration sent mixed messages. Even while trumpeting the ERI, it continued drawing down the permanent U.S. garrison in Europe and funding it through the Defense Department’s Overseas Contingency Operations account. Even more telling, the administration reduced the overall size of the Army from its Iraq-surge strength of about 560,000 to today’s approximately 470,000, without measurably reducing U.S. military commitments world-wide.

 

(more…)

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THE MILITARY NEEDS MODERN WAYS TO ATTRACT AND MANAGE TALENT

Monday, May 8th, 2017

 

www.wsj.com/articles/the-military-needs-modern-ways-to-attract-and-manage-talent-1493766438?tesla=y

 

The Military Needs Modern Ways to Attract and Manage Talent

A rigid, bureaucratic personnel system made sense in 1947. Now it’s dangerously out of date.

 

U.S. soldiers at the Storck barracks in Illesheim, Germany, March 9. PHOTO: NICOLAS ARMER/ZUMA PRESS

Aboard the Navy’s newest aircraft carrier in early March, President Trump vowed that the United States “will have the finest equipment in the world—planes, ships and everything else.” But what good will this equipment do if the military lacks the personnel to use it?

People are the vital ingredient to America’s military edge, but increasingly they are in short supply. “The Air Force has a shortfall of almost 1,500 pilots,” Joint Chiefs Chairman Gen. Joseph Dunfordtestified before a House committee in March. Similarly, the Army is offering bonuses to convince soldiers to extend their enlistments, the Marines cannot produce enough snipers, the Navy is straining to keep officers who operate its ships’ nuclear reactors, and all branches have struggled to build new cyber units.

These examples portend larger difficulties ahead. Even with the U.S. being threatened by enemies near and far who are evolving strategically and technologically, our military still operates with a personnel system designed in 1947 to fight the Soviet Union. Unchanged since then, this one-size-fits-all system for recruiting, retaining and promoting troops, treats nearly every service member as an interchangeable cog.

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THE U.S. NAVY MUST BE EVERYWHERE AT ONCE

Monday, May 8th, 2017

 

The U.S. Navy Must Be Everywhere at Once

A recent mishap with the USS Carl Vinson is a case study for rebuilding the fleet to about 350 ships.

The USS Bataan fires a missile during exercises in the Atlantic Ocean, Jan. 11.

The USS Bataan fires a missile during exercises in the Atlantic Ocean, Jan. 11. PHOTO:AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES

Mr. Lehman, secretary of the Navy under President Reagan, is the author of the forthcoming “Oceans Ventured, Oceans Gained” (W.W. Norton).

EXCERPT FROM THIS ARTICLE:  The next step is to reform the overgrown defense bureaucracy and overhaul the Pentagon’s dysfunctional procurement process. According to the Government Accountability Office, cost overruns have ballooned to more than $450 billion over the past two decades. The Navy needs to take authority back from the bureaucracy, end the culture of constant design changes and gold-plating, and bring back fixed-price competition.

Recall the development of the Polaris nuclear-missile system in the late 1950s. The whole package—a nuclear submarine, a solid-fuel missile, an underwater launch system, a nuclear warhead and a guidance system—went from the drawing board to deployment in four years (and using slide rules). Today, according to the Defense Business Board, the average development timeline for much less complex weapons is 22.5 years.

A case in point is the Ford-class aircraft carrier. The program is two years delayed and $2.4 billion over budget. The ship was designed to include 12 new technologies, such as electric instead of steam catapults that had not yet been developed. Many of these systems don’t work after 10 years of trying, and the ship will be delivered to the Navy without fully functional radar and unable to launch or recover aircraft. Yet the defense firms involved still profit under cost-plus contracts.

(more…)

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