Archive for the ‘Military’ Category

NAVAL AIR STATION ATTACK

Saturday, December 7th, 2019

Six Saudi Muslims arrested near Naval Air Station after jihad attack, three of them filmed the massacre

There needs to be a thorough and realistic reevaluation of this training program of foreign nationals. But that probably will not happen; it would be “Islamophobic.”

“Six Saudis are arrested over Pensacola naval base shooting including three who FILMED the attack by countryman who killed three and wounded eight before being shot dead – as FBI probes terror link,” by Andrew Court and Snejana Farberov, Dailymail.com, December 6, 2019:

The Air Force trainee who killed three and injured eight when he opened fire at a naval base in Florida assailed the United States as ‘a nation of evil’ before he went on his shooting rampage, AFP reports.

The man, first identified by NBC News as Saudi national Mohammed Saeed Alshamrani, opened fire inside a classroom at Naval Air Station in Pensacola early Friday morning. Police quickly responded to the scene and he was shot dead.

US officials, who spoke on condition of anonymity to discuss an ongoing investigation, said the suspect was a second lieutenant attending the aviation school at the base.

Meanwhile six other Saudi nationals were arrested near the base shortly after the attack, as investigators began to probe a terror link.

Three of the six were seen filming the entire incident as it unfolded, a source told The New York Times on Friday evening….

 

 

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GRATITUDE TOWARDS AMERICA – TREVOR LOUDON

Friday, December 6th, 2019

 

 A Personal Note:  Years ago, while my husband and I were living in Sydney, Australia, we were having dinner at a restaurant when the waiter came over to our table and gave us a bottle of champagne.  The waiter explained that the gentleman at another table had recognized that we were Americans and he wanted  to thank us  for The Battle of the Coral Sea.   A very special moment that I will never forget. This article was written by Trevor Loudon and he explains why he feels such gratitude to the United States .  It is because of our help to Australia and New Zealand during the Second World War.  Nancy

My Thanksgiving to America

Trevor Loudon
Trevor Loudon is an author, filmmaker, and public speaker from New Zealand. For more than 30 years, he has researched radical left, Marxist, and terrorist movements and their covert influence on mainstream politics.
CONTRIBUTOR
December 2, 2019

Over the Thanksgiving period, I pondered a lot on my debt to America. The first thing I owe this great country is probably my very existence. When growing up in 1960s New Zealand, it was accepted wisdom that we owed our freedom and our very lives to the “Yanks.”

In 1942, tens of thousands of young Kiwi and Aussie men were in North Africa fighting the Nazis and the Italian Fascist armies. The Japanese Imperial Army was marching relentlessly through the South Pacific and South East Asia. The Philippines fell; Hong Kong, Singapore, the Dutch East Indies, New Guinea, all were invaded in a matter of months, capturing thousands of British, Dutch, and colonial troops in the process.

The Japanese air force bombed Darwin in Northern Australia. There were reports of Japanese submarines in New Zealand harbors. In 1942, 22 New Zealand prisoners of war were beheaded by the Japanese on Tarawa. In 1943, Japanese prisoners rioted at a prisoner of war camp in our little North Island town of Featherston. More than 30 Japanese and one New Zealand guard were killed before order was restored. Rumors flew that the Japanese had already printed up the currency they were going to use when they invaded us.

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CHINA AND ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE

Thursday, December 5th, 2019

 

Another very unsettling article about the future of Artificial Intelligence and how China will probably be able to use our own data information against us.
We are about to enter a whole new world !  Nancy
 

Artificial Intelligence and the Adversary

What will Beijing do with the data it stole about American military service members and others?

By Samantha Ravich    Ms. Ravich is chairman of the Center on Cyber and Technology Innovation at the Foundation for Defense of Democracies and serves as a co-chairman of the Secretary of Energy Advisory Board’s Artificial Intelligence Working Group.
Wednesday, December 4, 2019

The potential benefits of artificial intelligence are proclaimed loudly, for all to hear. The dangers, however, are discussed quietly among national-security experts. The time has come to bring the general population into the discussion.

The benefits are enticing. With AI, the future promises longer life expectancy, increased productivity, and better preservation of precious resources. You will be able to take a picture of a mole on your leg and send it electronically to a dermatologist, who will use deep neural networks to determine whether it is skin cancer. Data-driven sensors and drones will determine the perfect amount of pesticide and water to promote agricultural diversity and counter monocropping. The AI revolution in transportation will herald autonomous planes, trains and automobiles. Music will be created to improve not only mood but heart rate and brain activity.

But we should know by now that advanced technology can also be used for ill. The whispered worst-case scenarios stem from malign actors gaining control of the massive data sets that will train machines to compute faster, better and perhaps with more-penetrating insight.

A fierce contest between the U.S. and China is under way over who will dominate this new frontier. The Chinese Communist Party has proclaimed that it will become the world’s leader in AI by 2030. Already China is hard at work, building out 5G networks world-wide and launching a new cryptocurrency as part of a strategy of “eco-political terraforming,” or building a world that will enable it to control massive amounts of information and use it for political and economic advantage. Beijing already hoards vast quantities of data about its own 1.4 billion people, none of whom have privacy rights under the Communist regime.

Nevertheless, Beijing isn’t satisfied. It has turned its sights on the U.S. and has already exfiltrated some of the most sensitive information on the American people and military. These include repeated breaches since 2013 of medical systems and databases, and the decadelong targeting of the U.S. Navy’s ship-maintenance records and the names and personal details of 100,000 of its personnel.

In time, through artificial intelligence, China will be able to use Americans’ data against us. Personalized medical records could become personalized bioweapons, for instance. In 2017 Zhang Shibo, a retired Chinese general, wrote that biotech could provide China an offensive capability through the creation of “specific ethnic genetic attacks.” As for the stolen Navy data, understanding how the U.S. maintains its fleets will help China point out vulnerabilities in U.S. weapons systems and ship design to be exploited during a confrontation.

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ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE AND OUR FUTURE

Tuesday, December 3rd, 2019

 

WASHINGTON EXAMINER

Embracing AI: How thinking weapons will simplify — and vastly complicate — future warfare

  Jamie McIntyre is the Washington Examiner’s senior writer on defense and national security. His morning newsletter, “Jamie McIntyre’s Daily on Defense,” is free and available by email subscription at dailyondefense.com. | November 14, 2019

For the Pentagon, it was an ominous glimpse into the future.

The date was July 11, 2014, and Ukrainian forces assembled about five miles from the Russian border in southeastern Ukraine were preparing for a final push to the border.

As Defense Secretary Mark Esper recounted to a forum sponsored by the National Security Commission on artificial intelligence this month, the Ukrainian troops, flushed with recent battlefield success against Russian-backed separatists, were feeling confident.

Suddenly, they heard the hum of Russian drones overhead, followed quickly by cyberattacks that jammed their communications, blinding their command and control systems.

Then a devastating fusillade of Russian artillery fire rained down on them, and in a matter of minutes, dozens of Ukrainian soldiers were killed, hundreds more wounded, and most of their armored vehicles destroyed.

The Ukrainian offensive was stopped dead in its tracks.

“The world was quickly awakened to a new era of warfare advanced by the Russians,” Esper said. “It’s clear the threats of tomorrow are no longer the ones we have faced and defeated in the past.”

Fast forward five years to today when rapid advances in artificial intelligence technology, or AI, foreshadow a grave new world of thinking machines and killer robots that will change the nature of modern warfare as profoundly as smart bombs and GPS did during the 1991 Persian Gulf War nearly three decades ago.

“Whichever nation harnesses AI first will have a decisive advantage on the battlefield for many, many years,” said Esper, who has made accelerating AI research and development a top Pentagon priority. “We have to get there first.”

Simply defined, artificial intelligence is the ability of computer systems to solve problems and perform tasks that would otherwise require human intelligence.

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ROUGH MEN VERSUS SOFT LAWYERS

Sunday, December 1st, 2019

 

 

“Central View,” by William Hamilton, J.D., Ph.D.  William Hamilton, is a laureate of the Oklahoma Military Hall of Fame, the Oklahoma Journalism Hall of Fame, the Nebraska Aviation Hall of Fame, the Colorado Aviation Hall of Fame, and the Oklahoma University Army ROTC Wall of Fame. Dr. Hamilton’s Formula for Failure in Vietnam: The Folly of Limited Warfare was published on November 20, 2019.  To order, call toll free: (800) 253-2187 “Central View,” can also be seen at: www.central-view.com.

Rough men versus soft lawyers

When it comes to President Trump’s thinking about the Navy’s strange prosecution of Navy SEAL Eddie Gallagher and some other SEALs, this quote from George Orwell comes to mind: “We sleep soundly in our beds because rough men stand ready in the night to visit violence on those who would do us harm.”

Yes, our Navy SEALs, Delta Force operators, Army Rangers and Special Forces are very rough men who take exception to the beheading of innocents and to putting pilots in cages and setting fire to them. In fact, our rough men, who reek of macho-male toxicity, have been visiting violence on those who would do us harm.

That, however, did not sit well with some female lawyers inside the Navy’s JAG Corps who decided our rough men should be brought to heel. Apparently, thinking the ends justify the means, they got NCIS investigators to coach and shape the testimony of interviewees. They used malware to listen in on discussions between Chief Petty Officer Gallagher and his lawyer. They hid a video clearing Gallagher of murder. And when a Navy Corpsman, under a grant of immunity, confessed that he killed the POW, not Gallagher, they pressed the case anyway. The presiding judge had to admonish the prosecutors for misconduct.

Then, after Gallagher was tried under the Uniform Code of Military Justice (UCMJ) by a jury of his peers and acquitted of all charges except for posing in a photo showing a dead terrorist, the Navy tried to give the team of prosecutors Navy Medals of Achievement for losing their case-in-chief. Is it any wonder that these antics drew the attention of the Commander-in-Chief of our Armed Forces?

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ABOLISH THE NATIONAL SECURITY COUNCIL

Monday, November 18th, 2019

 

End the War on Trump, Abolish the National Security Council

We can have free elections or the NSC.

Thu Nov 14, 2019 

Daniel Greenfield, a Shillman Journalism Fellow at the Freedom Center, is an investigative journalist and writer focusing on the radical Left and Islamic terrorism

Lt. Col. Alexander Vindman, the latest star of the Democrat effort to undo the 2016 election, is still at work on the National Security Council. While Trump supporters on the NSC like Rich Higgins and Ezra Cohen-Watnick were forced out, Vindman won’t be. NSC staffers who criticized Obama holdovers or sought to expose their misbehavior are gone, but Vindman is still there while undermining Trump.

And that’s the SNAFU of things on the NSC.

The National Security Council has been ground zero in the campaign against President Trump from the beginning. General Flynn’s appointment as National Security Advisor had touched the third rail because the NSC had been used to coordinate anti-Trump operations in the Susan Rice era.

The NSC doesn’t answer to Congress. Its members are meant to advise the president. (Except when they’re actually working for a previous president.) They command the implements of foreign policy, traditionally the weakest element in domestic politics, but not when they start treating their domestic political opponents as agents of a foreign state. And the size of the NSC has gotten out of control.

Under Obama, the NSC staff hit 400 people. That’s up from a dozen during its Cold War origins.

And it’s the staff that’s the problem.

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U.S. FINANCING CHINA’S WORLD DOMINATION PLANS

Friday, November 15th, 2019

 

This is an article you have to read as there is so much new information in it regarding China and how our financial markets are being used to finance China’s expansion of their technological and military advances.  Nancy
IMPRIMIS – HILLSDALE COLLEGE

Why and How the U.S. Should Stop Financing China’s Bad Actors

October 2019  • Volume 48, Number 10 • Roger W. Robinson, Jr.

Roger W. Robinson, Jr.
Chairman, Prague Security Studies Institute

Roger W. Robinson, Jr. is president and CEO of RWR Advisory Group and co-founder and chairman of the Prague Security Studies Institute. He earned a B.A. from Duke University and an M.A. from George Washington University. He served as senior director of international economic affairs on President Reagan’s National Security Council, where he was the principal architect of the secret economic and financial strategy that proved decisive to the defeat of the Soviet Union. He later served as chairman of the Congressional U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Commission. Prior to his government service, he was a vice president in the international department of the Chase Manhattan Bank.

The following is adapted from a speech delivered at Hillsdale College on September 9, 2019, during a conference on the topic, “Understanding China.”

In the early 1980s, I served on President Reagan’s National Security Council. Prior to my time at the White House, I was a vice president at Chase Manhattan Bank, in charge of its USSR and Eastern Europe division. It was my job to assess the creditworthiness of the countries in that part of the world, and I had come to realize that the Soviet Union had relatively modest hard currency income—and that what little it had came largely from the West.

In 1982, the Soviets had an empire stretching from Havana to Hanoi, but their hard currency revenue totaled only about $32 billion a year—roughly one-third the annual revenue of General Motors at the time. They were spending about $16 billion more annually than they were making, with the funding gap—the USSR’s life support—being financed by Western governments and banks.

President Reagan had long believed that the Soviet Union was economically vulnerable, because he knew it lacked the entrepreneurship, technological dynamism, and freedoms that are the prerequisites of a strong modern economy. And when he learned that we in the West were financing its brutal regime, he committed to slowing, and ultimately terminating, that flow of discretionary cash.

Our European allies had a completely different approach. Their belief in Ostpolitik, as the Germans called it, presupposed that commercial bridge-building would lead to geopolitical cooperation. If the West would offer financing and trade with the Soviets, peace and prosperity would result. Meanwhile, the Soviets were using the proceeds of Western loans, hard currency revenue streams, and technological support to build up their military, expand their empire, and engage in anti-Western activities.

The Reagan administration drew the line on a project called the Siberian Gas Pipeline, a 3,600-mile twin-strand pipeline that stretched from Siberia into the Western European gas grid. If completed, not only would it become the centerpiece of the Soviets’ hard currency earnings structure, but Western Europe would become dependent on the USSR for over 70 percent of its natural gas, weakening Western Europe’s ties to the U.S. and leaving the continent open to Kremlin extortion. Moreover, the pipeline was being financed on taxpayer-subsidized terms, since France and Germany viewed the USSR as a less developed country worthy of below-market interest rates.

The U.S. at the time had a monopoly on oil and gas technology that could drill through permafrost—which we had developed for Alaska’s North Slopeand we imposed oil and gas equipment sanctions on the USSR and European companies that were helping to build the Siberian pipeline. At one point, despite the strain it placed on relations with our NATO allies, we closed the U.S. market entirely to companies that continued to supply the pipeline project over our objections. Four of the six affected companies went under within six months, and Europeans woke up to the fact that they could do business with us or the Soviets, but not both.

As a result of these efforts we capped Soviet gas deliveries to Western Europe at 30 percent of total supplies, delayed the first strand of the pipeline by years and killed the second strand, and eventually helped dry up the bulk of Western credits to the USSR. In a secret deal, we also persuaded the Saudis to pump an additional two million barrels of oil per day and decontrolled prices at the wellhead in this country, knocking oil prices down to about $10 a barrel—significant because for every dollar decrease in the price of a barrel, the Soviets lost some 500 million to one billion dollars. In short, the Soviet Union never recovered from these economic and financial blows. It defaulted on some $96 billion in Western hard currency debt shortly before the total collapse of the Soviet empire.

The story with China today has certain similarities, but with one big difference: the U.S. has been playing the role of the naïve Europeans. Since adopting the Kissinger policy of engaging with China in the 1970s, our government has operated on the assumption that economic and financial relations with China would lead Beijing to liberalize politically. And since 2001, when we backed China’s entry into the World Trade Organization, the pace at which we have given China access to our best technology and capital and trade markets has accelerated. Yet China has shown no signs of embracing individual freedoms or the rule of law.

Instead, with our support, the Chinese have launched a massive campaign to become the world’s leading superpower. We know about the “Belt and Road Initiative,” a strategic undertaking to place huge segments of the world under China’s influence or outright control. We know about “Made in China 2025,” a strategy designed to dominate key technology sectors—from artificial intelligence and quantum computing to hypersonic missiles and 5G. We know about China’s practice of forced technology transfers: requiring American companies to share their trade secrets and R&D in order to do business in China. We know about China’s predatory trade practices. We know many of these things only because President Trump has brought them to the forefront of national attention, for which he deserves credit. And the ongoing tariff war is a good thing in the sense that we’ve finally begun to take a stand.

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A SHORT VETERANS DAY FICTIONAL STORY

Sunday, November 10th, 2019

 

In honor of Veterans Day, I am sending out a fictional short story that was written by Edward Reed especially for Veterans Day.  To read more of Edward Reed’s writings, the link below will take you to his website.  Several of my favorite short stories of his is Old Dogs  and Valley of the Shadow.  Badge, one of his published books, is also a favorite.  Edward Reed writes of  a time of family love, hardship,  patriotism and the once common appreciation of the simple things of life.   Nancy

The Rest of the Story

The Rest of the Story

For over fifty years Luther Hobbs, Wilmer’s Hobbs’ younger brother, has flown a flag every Veterans Day. It was something his father did until he no longer could, then Luther took over. It was a way to honor Wilmer,  a way to remember.

Luther will be the first to admit that his memory isn’t as good as it used to be

“Time is catching up to me,” is something he says more and more these days while watching  the evening sun drift behind tall trees he used to climb as a boy. That was until Wilmer was killed. After Wilmer was killed climbing trees was no longer fun.

Wilmer had taught him how to climb trees,  and so many other things, things he would never forget things like;  how to throw a curve ball, how to bait a fishing hook, ride a bicycle, how to not be afraid of the dark, and the Lord’s Prayer.

Wilmer taught him how to tie his shoes too. Luther still remembers that afternoon, and how long it took and how patient Wilmer was as they sat on the porch steps until he finally caught on. He remembers it every morning when he ties his shoe laces.

Sometimes he hears Wilmer’s voice whispering to him and sometimes calling out from across the fields, and sometimes when he walks along the stream. It was by the stream where Wilmer first told him he was going away to fight in the war. It was where Wilmer let him listen to his grandfather’s watch that last time.

Luther thinks about that watch now and then. He still remembers its ticks and tocks. The old watch wasn’t among Wilmer’s things that the Army sent home after he was killed.

Luther still kept those things, a few medals, and ribbons, Wilmer’s dog tag, and two stripes that he never got around to sewing onto his uniform. He keeps them in a box, the same box that he keeps the flag that once draped his brother’s coffin. Its the flag he takes out every Veteran’s day and hoists high, unfurling it in the crisp November breeze just as the sun peaks over the mountain top.

This Veteran’s Day, like Luther’s memories, there is not as much left of his brother’s flag  to dance in the morning breeze.

Two weeks ago Luther’s grandchildren  dug the old flag out burned it. When he was awakened by smoke he thought his whole world was on fire. In a way it was and still is as he continues nursing burns from reaching in the hot blazing flames.

He did it without thinking.

“A silly thing,” the doctor at the emergency room told him.

Luther listened.

“It’s just an old flag,” the doctor said more than once. It was the same thing celebrities say, and what his grandchildren said while they watched him rescue the old flag they set out to destroy.

“Because being an American isn’t cool.”

By some miracle all of the red, white, and blue wasn’t burned and enough stars and stripes survived for Luther Hobbs to fly his brother’s flag this Veteran’s Day and remember.

I pray this is a work of fiction I pray, but fear it’s not. Edward Reed 2019

 

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THE FOREVER WARS OF THE MIDDLE EAST

Sunday, October 13th, 2019

 

Controversy is swirling throughout Washington on President Trump’s decision to withdraw a small number of U.S. Troops from the Turkish/Syrian border.  The commentary below will give you some idea just how complicated the controversy  of the entire Middle East is.  Many Americans are tired of hearing about the constant fighting that has been going on in the Middle East for eons.    You be the judge on what you think our American policy should be.
Nancy  Trump 2020 !

October 13, 2019 

MY CORNER by Boyd Cathey

President Trump Is Right On Syria!

The unified foreign policy establishment in Washington, the Deep State politicos—from Lindsey Graham and Lynne Cheney in Congress, to the frenzied Never Trumpers like Peggy Noonan in The Wall Street Journal, [“he’s (Trump) all impulse, blithely operating out of his depth”], to the near totality of the progressivist Left (e.g. Chuck Schumer, Diane Feinstein, and others), have come together (as they always will) to protect their sacred commitment to globalism and, this time, in fanatical opposition to President Trump’s decision to finally withdraw American support troops from northeastern Syria.
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VIDEO – IN HONOR OF VIETNAM POW/MIA RECOGNITION DAY – SEPTEMBER 20

Friday, September 20th, 2019

 

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 2019 IS RECOGNITION DAY FOR OUR POW/MIA ‘S
THE FOLLOWING VIDEO EXPLAINS THE MILITARY DECISIONS THAT LED UP TO THE END OF THE VIETNAM WAR AND THE  RELEASE OF OUR VIETNAM POW’S IN 1973.
Many thanks to Colonel Bernard L Talley, (Ret) who was a Vietnam POW for 6 1/2 years for sharing this video with us.   Nancy
VIDEO

“PAC 6: A General’s Decision”

Linebacker II was the primary military mission that led to the end of the US involvement in the Vietnam War. Most importantly, it secured the release of our POWs, some of whom had been held in extreme, unimaginable and torturous conditions for more than 7 years. Taking place in and around Hanoi, the most heavily defended city in the world at the time, Linebacker II was quite possibly the most intense use of air power in our nation’s history.

“PAC 6: A General’s Decision” is the the story of the decisions made by Brigadier General Glenn R. Sullivan and others which enabled the success of the Linebacker II mission. It is also the story of the General’s son and his own search for understanding and the truths of his father’s involvement.

After losing nine B-52s which was attributed to methods originated not in the battlefield but in Omaha, Nebraska, something needed to be done. General Sullivan, along with staff and crew members, developed and recommended new tactics sent directly to General J.C. Meyer, Commander of Strategic Air Command (SAC). By taking this direct action for the sake of expedience, General Sullivan bypassed his immediate supervisor, thus jumping the “chain of command”. The changes were effective and resulted in achieving the goals of getting the North Vietnamese back to the negotiating table, securing the release of the POWs, and saving the lives of untold numbers of crew members..Ironically, Sullivan’s action came at the expense of his beloved career in the Air Force.

 

 

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