Archive for the ‘Trade Agreements’ Category

NAVY, INDUSTRY PARTNERS ARE ‘UNDER CYBER SIEGE’ BY CHINESE HACKERS

Tuesday, March 12th, 2019

 

THE WALL STREET JOURNAL

Navy, Industry Partners Are ‘Under Cyber Siege’ by Chinese Hackers, Review Asserts

Hacking threatens U.S.’s standing as world’s leading military power, study says

Navy Secretary Richard V. Spencer testified before the Senate Committee on Armed Services last week.
Navy Secretary Richard V. Spencer testified before the Senate Committee on Armed Services last week. PHOTO: RON SACHS/ZUMA PRESS

March 12, 2019 2:32 p.m. ET

WASHINGTON—The Navy and its industry partners are “under cyber siege” by Chinese hackers and others who have stolen tranches of national security secrets in recent years, exploiting critical weaknesses that threaten the U.S.’s standing as the world’s top military power, an internal Navy review has concluded.

The assessment, delivered to Navy Secretary Richard Spencer last week and reviewed by The Wall Street Journal, depicts a branch of the armed forces under relentless cyberattack by foreign adversaries and struggling in its response to the scale and sophistication of the problem.

Drawing from extensive research and interviews with senior officials across the Trump administration, the tone of the review is urgent and at times dire, offering a rare, unfiltered look at the military’s cybersecurity liabilities.

KEY TAKEAWAYS FROM THE NAVY REVIEW

The Navy report’s authors conducted 31 site visits and interviewed 85 current senior military officers and civilians across both the Navy and wider Defense Department, as well as senior officials at the Federal Bureau of Investigation, Department of Homeland Security and White House National Security Council, among others. Here are their main conclusions:

  • The Navy and its industry partners are facing relentless cyber attacks that seek to steal sensitive national security data by a wide range of foes, with China and Russia the most adept and strategic.
  • The U.S. is at risk of losing global military and economic advantages due to cyberthefts of secrets and intellectual property.
  • Despite efforts to address the problem, the defense industrial base has suffered “a flood of breaches of significant data” and “continues to hemorrhage critical data.”
  • The Navy and Defense Department have only a limited understanding of the totality of losses they and their partners are suffering.
  • The Navy is focused on “preparing to win some future kinetic battle, while it is losing the current global, counter-force, counter-value, cyber war,” the review’s authors conclude.

The 57-page document is especially scathing in its assessment of how the Navy has addressed cybersecurity challenges facing its contractors and subcontractors, faulting naval officials for not anticipating that adversaries would attack the defense industrial base and for not adequately informing those partners of the cyber threat. It also acknowledges a lack of full understanding about the extent of the damage.

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VIDEO AND ARTICLE – TRUMP HAS BEEN CONSISTENT ON TRADE SINCE THE 1980’S

Saturday, November 17th, 2018

 

VIDEO – TRUMP INTERVIEW AT AGE 34 WITH RONA BARRETT IN 1980
THE WALL STREET JOURNAL
TRUMP FORGED TRADE IDEAS IN 1980’S – AND NEVER DEVIATED
His stance dates to the rise of Japan as a global economic power

Nov. 15, 2018 12:55 p.m. ET

EXCERPT FROM THIS ARTICLE:  Mr. Trump articulated the core principles that frame his trade agenda from his first national TV interview—an October 1980 discussion with talk show host Rona Barrett at the height of the Iran hostage crisis.  Mr. Trump decried America as a country where “we just sit back and take everybody’s abuse.”
He touted business executives as smarter than politicians, arguing the most capable leaders don’t run for office.  “They head major corporations.”

Three decades before President Trump’s trade agenda jolted the world, he laid out his vision in full-page newspaper advertisements foreshadowing what was to come.

“Japan and other nations have been taking advantage of the United States” for years, wrote the New York real-estate developer, in the typewritten letter addressed “To The American People,” his signature affixed to the bottom.

“ ‘Tax’ these wealthy nations, not America. End our huge deficits, reduce our taxes…” the September 1987 ads demanded. “Let’s not let our great country be laughed at anymore.”

Trade has been a defining issue for the Trump administration during its turbulent first two years, providing the basis for an economic and diplomatic approach that has shaken up the post-World War II global order. The administration has imposed tariffs on half the $500 billion in Chinese goods imported annually, and on steel and aluminum from around the world, while threatening to do the same on cars. Mr. Trump has strong-armed JapanEuropeCanada and Mexico to the negotiating table.

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TRUMP’S ACCOMPLISHMENTS

Saturday, September 15th, 2018

Trump’s Accomplishments

Trump’s Accomplishments

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MOVIE – REVELATION – DAWN OF GLOBAL GOVERNMENT

Sunday, September 2nd, 2018

 

This is a movie that was produced during the Obama Administration and warns of  the many  dangers facing our country  – Socialism, Marxism, Globalists, Globalism, Agenda 21, Sustainability, The Secret Society, Bilderberg, the push for a National ID and Biometrics, Muslim Brotherhood, Sharia Law, Open Borders, Gun Control, the Federal Reserve system  and most of all, Collectivism versus Individualism.
Today, President Trump is addressing many of these dangers and is it any wonder he is facing such hostility from the entrenched elitists in our country ?
Believe or disbelieve, you be the judge.    Nancy
NEW WORLD ORDER – ONE WORLD GOVERNMENT
MOVIE – REVELATION  
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FRIENDLY ADVICE FOR CHINA’S LEADERS

Saturday, August 25th, 2018

 

Very informative background information on how the U.S. has helped China to become the economic powerhouse  that it is today and that the time has come to end the favorable trade terms that China enjoys.  Nancy
    
THE WALL STREET JOURNAL

Some Friendly Advice for China’s Leaders

You can’t expect to keep receiving favorable trade and investment terms unless you reciprocate.

 

The trade dispute between the U.S. and China threatens to destabilize arguably the world’s most important bilateral relationship. A better understanding of the countries’ shared history may encourage wiser negotiations.

There is a great deal of pride in China for the country’s remarkable success. Compared with our population of roughly 300 million, China has a population of 1.4 billion. It should be no surprise that China is now the world’s second-largest economy. Since its economic opening in the 1970s, many Chinese citizens have been educated in the U.S. and then returned to China to become leaders in government and industry. The China of today is fully capable of competing with foreigners in its domestic markets on a level playing field, as its firms have proven overseas.

The contributions the U.S. has made to China are worth noting. Starting in 1900, the Open Door policy, advanced by the U.S., spared China from European colonization. Prior to World War II, the U.S. imposed an embargo on Japan and deployed military assets to the Pacific in defense of that policy. Before the U.S. entered the war, the Flying Tigers, an American volunteer group, were recruited from the U.S. military and mobilized to assist China’s defense against Japan. The U.S. provided extensive additional support throughout the war to the Chinese and ultimately spilled considerable blood on their behalf. At war’s end, the U.S. ensured that China was included as one of the five permanent members of the United Nations Security Council.

After the Chinese Revolution in 1949, Mao Zedong established the People’s Republic, sending the Chinese into international isolation for two decades. Then in 1972, President Nixon and national security adviser Henry Kissinger re-established bilateral ties by signing the Shanghai Communiqué during the president’s historic visit to China. It was in the national interest of both countries to foster a more constructive relationship. Both viewed the Soviet Union as a strategic threat.

China was populous and rich in natural resources, but its economy was minuscule and in shambles from a decade of internal conflict. After Mao’s death, Deng Xiaoping sought stronger ties with the U.S. He understood that China’s future political stability would hinge on its economic success.

When bilateral trade resumed, the U.S. extended favorable trade terms to foster China’s economic growth. Tariffs on Chinese imports into the U.S. were low—on average a third of those on U.S. exports to China. Bilateral trade grew from zero to several billion dollars within a few years. In 1979 President Carter re-established formal diplomatic relations, and China was given most favored nation trading status. In 1981 the Reagan administration created a separate trade category for China to exempt it from restrictions on trade with every other communist country.

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