Archive for the ‘Illegal Immigration’ Category

VIDEO – NANCY PELOSI – U.S. MUST NOT SUPPRESS VOTES OF NEWLY ARRIVED IMMIGRANTS

Monday, March 11th, 2019

 

VIDEO

Watch–Nancy Pelosi: New Immigrants Must Not Have Their Votes Suppressed
House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) said the United States must not suppress the vote of newly arrived legal immigrants — including those foreign nationals who arrive en masse at the U.S.-Mexico border.
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‘TERRORISM’ AT THE SOUTHERN BORDER

Thursday, February 14th, 2019

 

THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Case of terror suspect caught sneaking into U.S. roils immigration debate

By Stephen Dinan   January 21, 2019

Zabi-Ullah Hemmat wasn’t just one of 415,816 illegal immigrants caught at the southwest border in fiscal 2016. Nor was he just another of the 84 people from Afghanistan apprehended by Border Patrol agents that year.

What made Mr. Hemmat of special interest to authorities is that when he was snared by agents after 11 p.m. on a chilly November night and they ran his name through federal databases, he came back listed on the no-fly terrorist watch-list.

Mr. Hemmat is one of the terrorism suspects caught trying to sneak into the U.S. from Mexico — a category of people that is very much part of the current debate over illegal immigration, with President Trump insisting his border wall would deter people from being able to reach American soil and Democrats saying there’s no real danger.

Mr. Hemmat’s case suggests both may be wrong.

He was indeed on U.S. terrorism lists, linked to both the Taliban and a plot somewhere in North America, according to Department of Homeland Security documents. But after he was caught, wandering in southern Arizona with two Mexican guides and five other men from Afghanistan and Pakistan, he said he had sneaked in by crawling under an existing border fence near Nogales, Arizona.

Democrats say the number of potential terrorists who do try to enter via the land border is negligible, and several news reports over the last week say the numbers amount to the low double digits each year.

Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen says the exact numbers are too sensitive to release, but she says it’s on the increase.

Homeland Security does say it “encountered” more than 3,000 “special interest” migrants — people whose nationalities and travel patterns made them potential national security concerns — at the southern border in 2018.

“I am sure all Americans would agree that one terrorist reaching our borders is one too many. These are just the terror suspects we know about who reach our border,” Ms. Nielsen said on Twitter, defending the White House’s claims.

The Washington Times has not been able to independently verify a total number of terrorists who have entered via the southwest border, but it has spent several years tracking cases such as Mr. Hemmat‘s, where someone with terrorist connections was nabbed after sneaking in.

Among those were four Turkish men who claimed ties to a Marxist insurgency known by the acronym DHKP/C, who paid $8,000 apiece to be smuggled into the U.S. They traveled from Istanbul via Paris to Mexico City, then shuttled to the border where they were caught in 2014.

(more…)

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TECHNOLOGY VERSUS THE WALL

Monday, February 4th, 2019

 

Has anyone suggested “armed drones”  ?  They would certainly get the attention of
those who are illegally crossing our border !   Nancy

Democrats who killed Bush’s ‘virtual fence’ now back ‘technological wall’ at border

by S. A. Miller

January 13, 2019
Bush’ ‘virtual fence’ killed by Obama

The Department of Homeland Security spent seven years and more than $1 billion trying to create a wall of technology at the border — or, as President George W. Bush called it, a “virtual fence.” It was a bust.

Now the idea has returned as the main ante for congressional Democrats in the border security spending fight. Opposed to President Trump’s physical barriers, they say drones, sensors and other electronics are all the tools needed — a “technological wall,” in the words of House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, California Democrat.

The Obama administration in 2011 pulled the plug on the Bush-era Secure Border Initiative Network, or SBINet, which was envisioned as an integrated system of radar, sensors and video cameras along the entire U.S.-Mexico border.

Democrats at the time cheered the decision to cancel the contract with Boeing for the long-troubled program.

Rep. Bennie G. Thompson, a Mississippi Democrat who was the ranking member of the House Homeland Security Committee, called SBINet a “grave and expensive disappointment” for squandering a little more than $1 billion to achieve just 53 miles of coverage on the border in Arizona.

Mr. Thompson, who now chairs the committee, said last week that he is ready to try again rather than spend on Mr. Trump’s corrugated steel fence.

“I have been engaging the tech community. They are telling me that they are developing modern technology that will help us identify those vulnerabilities. I would like for us to go in that direction,” he said on “PBS NewsHour.”

He said U.S. Customs and Border Protection already have high-tech sensors that just need to be used in a better way.

The Washington Times asked Mr. Thompson’s office what had changed since 2011 and whether he fully backed Mrs. Pelosi’s “technological wall.”

“He does support proven and effective technology to be used at the border where appropriate. SBINet simply did not work, was not deployed correctly and was overly ambitious,” said Thompson spokesman Adam Comis.

The border security debate and Mr. Trump’s demand for $5.7 billion for a border fence are at the heart of the standoff between the White House and Democrats that has kept the government partially shut down for more than three weeks.

Border security analysts agree that the technology has improved by leaps and bounds since 2011, but they disagree on whether sensors and remote imaging can substitute for physical barriers.

Jay F. Nunamaker Jr., director of the National Center for Border Security and Immigration at the University of Arizona, had no doubt that technology could replace walls and fences.

“The combination of all the cameras, night vision cameras, you could see people walking through marshes and streams like it was bright daylight,” he said, recalling a 2013 visit to a border security command center set up at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base in Tucson.

“Technology has only improved since then,” he said.

National security scholar James R. Phelps, co-author of the 2014 book “Border Security,” said the question isn’t whether the technology works in detecting border jumpers — it does.

“The question then becomes, ‘Do they actually stop anybody?’ The answer to that is no,” he said. “It is definitely not a substitute. It works in conjunction with physical barriers.”

A big difference between sensors and fences, he said, is where Border Patrol agents apprehend smugglers or illegal immigrants. The high-tech sensors and video cameras don’t prevent or hamper illegal border crossings.

“Once they are on U.S. soil, inside the United States of America, you now have to go through all the legal processes and administrative processes,” said Mr. Phelps. “You have to determine if they are here legally or illegally, collect the biometrics to put through the criminal check systems, detain them or arrest them, set them up for a deportation hearing, put them in front of a judge, potentially house them, treat them medically. The list goes on and on and on — with all the expenses associated with that person once they set foot in the United States.”

The scenario also depends on Border Patrol agents apprehending border jumpers after they appear on video screens.

“It does no good to detect illegal crossings unless someone is available to track them down, and fairly quickly, before the crossers disappear into the many private homes, farms, businesses, vehicles and natural hiding places that are in the border areas, often very close to the border,” said Jessica M. Vaughan, director of policy studies at the Center for Immigration Studies. “Technology by itself does not prevent anyone from crossing the way a real wall or fence does.”

(more…)

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SOCIAL JUSTICE MOVEMENT IN OUR UNIVERSITIES

Thursday, January 24th, 2019

 

 

Here is an example of what is happening in colleges and universities.

“DREAMers: How a Youth Movement Challenged Immigrant Rights Orthodoxy” by Prof. Enid Trucios-Haynes, UofL’s Brandeis School of Law

This presentation will discuss the rise of an immigrant rights movement led by undocumented youth over the past decade. In the mid-2000s, undocumented young people came out of the shadows and declared themselves to be undocumented and unafraid. They sought legislation, the DREAM Act, to provide legal status for those who came to the U.S. as children and had become undocumented when they turned eighteen. They challenged the negative dehumanizing terminology of “illegal aliens” by identifying DREAMers as exceptional students, and later by uniting through the creation of national coalitional organizations. After marching in Washington D.C. in 2010, these youth activists used civil disobedience tactics to petition Congress directly for the DREAM Act. Youth activists became empowered to speak for themselves, their undocumented parents, and the entire undocumented community in the U.S. Their progressive agenda, seeking dignity, respect, and recognition, led President Obama to create the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) Program after Congress refused to act. Although this program does not provide legal status, and is currently in limbo due to litigation, undocumented young people — now out of the shadows — continue to build the movement and coalitions to challenge the restrictionist immigration policies of the Trump Administration.

This is part of a 6-week short course that offers historical and contemporary perspectives on a variety of social justice movements. Six scholars from the University of Louisville’s Anne Braden Institute for Social Justice Research and Muhammad Ali Institute for Peace and Justice will explore aspects of social movement-building on topics such as racial justice, youth-led immigrant justice, LGBTQ rights, and solidarity, among others. 

This class is free and open to the public, but registration is required. Call 502-574-1623 to reserve your spot.

Location: Louisville Free Public Library

Main Library
301 York St.
Louisville, KY 40203

Date & Location

Date: 1/24/2019
Time: 6:30 PM to 8:00 PM
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IMMIGRANTS AND DISEASE

Monday, January 21st, 2019

 

Immigrants and Disease

By Walter E.Williams   Walter E. Williams is a professor of economics at George Mason University. 

August 29, 2018

The Immigration and Nationality Act mandates that all immigrants and refugees undergo a medical screening examination to determine whether they have an inadmissible health condition. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has technical instructions for medical examination of prospective immigrants in their home countries before they are permitted to enter the U.S. They are screened for communicable and infectious diseases such as tuberculosis, malaria, hepatitis, polio, measles, mumps and HIV. They are also tested for syphilis, gonorrhea and other sexually transmitted diseases. The CDC also has medical screening guidelines for refugees. These screenings are usually performed 30 to 90 days after refugees arrive in the United States.

But what about people who enter our country illegally? The CDC specifically cites the possibility of the cross-border movement of HIV, measles, pertussis, rubella, rabies, hepatitis A, influenza, tuberculosis, shigellosis and syphilis. Chris Cabrera, a Border Patrol agent in South Texas, warned: “What’s coming over into the U.S. could harm everyone. We are starting to see scabies, chickenpox, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections and different viruses.” Some of the youngsters illegally entering our country are known to be carrying lice and suffering from various illnesses. Because there have been no medical examinations of undocumented immigrants, we have no idea how many are carrying infectious diseases that might endanger American children when these immigrants enter schools across our nation.

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VIDEO BEST ARGUMENT FOR SUPPORTING A BORDER WALL

Wednesday, January 9th, 2019

VIDEO    WHY A WALL IS NECESSARY

(305) Build The Wall: The Best Argument You Will Ever Hear! – YouTube

 

 

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CALL YOUR ELECTED OFFICIALS TO SUPPORT THE WALL

Wednesday, January 9th, 2019

 

If you feel strongly that our country needs a secure border and that the border wall should be funded and built, call your senators and representatives in congress and let them know.  You will be able to locate the contact information for your individual officials on the following link.   President Trump needs our support on this critical issue. Call tomorrow !  Please forward this information to your email lists.  Nancy
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VIDEOS TRIPLE AMPUTEE VET – FACEBOOK PULLED HIS FB PAGE

Tuesday, January 8th, 2019

 

 

Subject: TRIPLE AMPUTEE VET goes to Nancy P’s Office to collect HER $1

 

TRIPLE AMPUTEE…Brian seeking Nancy Pelosi…1st link;  2nd link is interview with Mike Huckabee…he is Highly decorated Vet.see his medals on his left chest!

He loves our country…has no legs and 1 arm…can’t run after his children for fun. And, Facebook PULLED HIS FB page…!

 

 

youtu.be/afNl7Ur-RRI

 

www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ht5337bsx4I

 

 

 

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NORTH CAROLINA SHERIFFS, DEALING WITH CARTEL VIOLENCE AND DRUGS, CALL FOR CONGRESS TO FUND WALL

Thursday, January 3rd, 2019

 

North Carolina Sheriffs, Dealing With Cartel Violence, Call for Congress to Fund Wall

January 1, 2019 Updated: January 2, 2019

More than 1,400 miles north of the southwest border, sheriffs are battling drug trafficking, overdoses, gang and cartel violence, and human trafficking.

“If something gets through the border, within a few days, two or three days, it’s across this country,” said Rockingham County Sheriff Sam Page.

Sheriffs in North Carolina are calling on Congress to approve funding for a border wall and better border security.

North Carolina has become a major hub for the transport and distribution of wholesale cocaine and other drugs throughout the northeastern corridor, according to the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA).

Page said he does what he can to support the sheriffs situated in counties along the southwest border.

“If we can support them, it prevents a lot of those drugs from coming in and getting into our communities here in the interior United States,” Page said.

“If we fail to secure our borders, every sheriff in America will become a border sheriff.”

Alamance County Sheriff Terry Johnson said his county has huge problems with the Sinaloa cartel and its drug trafficking operations.

Alamance is right on the intersection of two major interstates, I-40 and I-95, and nearby city Greensboro has become the drug trafficking hub for the southeastern United States, Johnson said.

(more…)

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THE COST OF ILLEGAL IMMIGRATION – STATE BY STATE

Sunday, December 30th, 2018

State by state detailed infographics on how much illegals burden you and your state:

Alabama Kentucky North
Dakota
Alaska Louisiana Ohio
Arizona Maine Oklahoma
Arkansas Maryland Oregon
California Massachusetts Pennsylvania
Colorado Michigan Rhode Island
Connecticut Minnesota South Carolina
Delaware Mississippi South Dakota
District of Columbia Missouri Tennessee
Florida Montana Texas
Georgia Nebraska Utah
Hawaii Nevada Vermont
Idaho New Hampshire Virginia
Illinois New Jersey Washington
Indiana New Mexico West Virginia
Iowa New York Wisconsin
Kansas North
Carolina
Wyoming

 

 

 

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